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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Exposure times for Rollie IR film

    In a sunny 16 situtation, what would be a typical exposure time for the Rollier IR film using an 89B IR filter?
    I have only done IR with a non converted digital. Exposures can easily be 30 sec.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    With a #87 I do EV+12 stops or so. No idea about the 89b, what is the cutoff for that? If it's a higher cutoff than the 87 then you can pretty much forget this film.

    My suggestion would be to bracket in two stop increments at say EV+9, EV+11, and EV+13. If the exposure goes past a sec or two then add even another stop.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    In my APUG gallery there are two shots I took with this film and a Hoya R72 filter. To take into account the filter factor I metered one at EI 3, and the other at EI 12.

    Here is a link to one of them:

    swirl

    The exposure details are indicated in the posts.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt

  4. #4
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Thanks Matt, 8 sec @ f/16 tells me where to start. IR can be so interesting and this is my first try with IR film. Do you process your own film?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  5. #5
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Rollei IR 820/400 with a RG715 (#88A) bay I filter on my Yashica Mat 124-G.

    Handheld 1/30S f=4,0
    E.I. 12
    Normally you will need a tripod.

    The best is to develop IR films in a semi-compensating developer.
    In this way: AM74/RHS 1+9 7:00 Min. (The 1+9 dilution adds approx. 10% of the developing time)

    http://www.fotohuisrovo.nl/documenta...ei%20films.pdf


    Best regards,

    Robert

  6. #6
    AgX
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    stradibarius,

    It's `Rollei´.

  7. #7
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Sorry AgX, it was a typo!!! Oh, and it's stradibarrius...
    Robert, can you explain compensated developer? I use D76 typically 1:1. I don not have a lot of processing experience so please forgive my ignorance.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  8. #8
    RobertV's Avatar
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    explain compensated developer?
    You have to do some bracketing and always one picture without filter to check the development later.
    Because you're unknown about the amount of IR light in the atmosphere the compensating developer helps if you are a bit out of range. Further you have to compensate a little bit for the focussing: IR light has just another breaking index. Normally you try with a W.A. lens which has a reasonable D.O.F.
    You see some parameters are a bit in the gambling zone.

    Best regards,

    Robert

  9. #9
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Compensating developers will capture more range in the neg... but can also give you a flatter neg so then you'll probably need to boost your contrast grade in printing- no big deal. An extreme example of a compensating developer is POTA, with which you can get ~20 stops of range in a normal film, I posted an example recently from a night scene that I guessed had at least 12 stops of range in it and was extremely difficult to meter- basically it was a wild guess and all I had loaded was efke 25, not the world's most forgiving film, so I used POTA and voila, easily printable neg...

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...7&ppuser=16571

    You probably can't tell from this grade 3 quickie contact print ^^^ but there is literally no part of the neg without full detail... except the little hot lights themselves, but even they aren't badly blown. But again, POTA is an *extreme* example, a 'supercompensating' developer. Probably holds the world's record in compensation, I'd not be surprised if 22-24 stops is possible with some films using POTA.

    With my IR stuff I sometimes use wd2d+, a pyro developer. The reason being, IR photographs tend to have a lot of detail in the whites that people simply neglect. IMHO too many IR shots go white as snow in the highlights... detail-less white... when in fact there is a lot of interesting texture there. A pyro developer helps you keep the highlights and has one other big advantage too: it scans very well. This is important in some cases because IR films on the market (and actually, also HIE) aren't/weren't exactly the most reliable b&w film products... they don't store well. I see all kinds of scratches and dust and whatnot, more than usual. More prone to static too, perhaps? I don't know. In my experience, the Rollei stuff is the least problematic, but nevertheless the film base is very thin and prone to scratches etc. Now, wd2d+ is helpful with thin / very flexible / slightly fragile negs. Something to keep in mind, if you are open to scanning as a way to correct scratches and specks etc. I think you will find that all the IR films are a bit more prone to damage than ordinary b&w films.

    Finally, I'd just like to say a few words in favour of superpan. I recently began working with this film and... suffice it to say I just bought my second big box. Love it.
    Last edited by keithwms; 05-09-2009 at 09:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #10
    RobertV's Avatar
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    I'd just like to say a few words in favour of superpan
    What a coincedence. I just tried the film in AM74/RHS and while searching for a replacement for the AM20/AM50 High Definition developer, (Amaloco Photochemicals, discontinued ) I have tested the Super Pan 200 in with Beutler last night.

    The IR possibilities are however limited compared with the IR 820/400 film.



    SP 200 E.I. 400 in AM74/RHS



    SP 200 E.I. 160 in Beutler 1+1+10 9:30 min. at 20 degrees C.

    An example for IR with this film I have to search and scan.

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