Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,990   Posts: 1,524,140   Online: 1110
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    142

    Old fixer in powder form expired ?

    Hi,

    I dig into the chemistry closet of my photo club and it seems that we have lot of that Agfa rapid fixer. I'm using this one for prints for a while, but I just use it for film recently and I guess there is a problem with it. After fixing my first roll with this one following the 2-3 mins recommendation, I had kind of yellowish light stain on my dry negative. Another member said that this way because the film was under fix.

    Thing is that the fixer was freshly mixed from the powder bag. I mixed it myself, so I'm pretty sure it was mixed properly. I check the clear time and obtained a 3 minutes clear time. This is about the recommended time, which should be more than twice the clear time. I also check with fixer tester stripes, which test for silver concentration and the pH. These testing stripes tell me that the fixer is all right.

    Then, is it possible that this fixer, even in powder form, is expired ?

    Thanks,

    Jeff

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,309
    The rule of thumb is that fix time should be 2X clear time. Agitate in fixer just as you do in developer. Some films take longer to clear than others. I fix all my films for 5 minutes. You can refix and rewash the negatives and they will most likely be fine.

    Some fixers are diluted for use with paper or use shorter fix times for paper, especially RC papers. Fixer usually is used full-strength for film. I've not used your particular fixer, but I'd say your friend was right.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #3
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    I do the same as pgomena - fix for 5 minutes.

    The fixer sounds fine. The film wasn't T-max was it?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    142
    In fact, this second time, I fixed for 8 minutes and it seems that it was still not enough. The film was HP5+ in sheets.

  5. #5
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Just dump it then. Don't take risks with fixer. However, if you still have some of the old fixer left over, I'd half the dilution and try again. I'm not a chem expert but it sounds strange that powder form fixer would ever go bad.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  6. #6
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    989
    When I started in the darkroom in the late 1960's the fixing time for film in "regular" fixer was 10 minutes. I recall our Camera club had a large stock of "Ansco Acid Fixer" which came in cans. Those who had money bought "rapid fixer" which came as a liquid - sometimes with a bottle of hardner and fixed in 2-3 minutes.

    I think the "old stuff" is still sold as "Kodak Fixer" in powder form. these days it is in envelopes which may not be as air tight as the cans. The liquid stuff DOES go bad BTW, if you get a yellow precipitate it is past use.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin