Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,760   Posts: 1,516,051   Online: 885
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    204

    Road Trip Precautions for Film

    Are there any special precautions you take when traveling with film (e.g,. in a car) on a long road trip?

    I'm thinking about doing some traveling this summer, and I don't want any of the film exposed to excess heat very much (e.g., just in case I have to leave the film in my car while I'm on a trip). Would it be a good idea to leave my film in some kind of ice cooler to maintain the integrity of the film?

    Thanks for all of your responses!

  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,034
    Images
    30
    I get a big tupperware container to hold the film in, and then place that in a cooler.

  3. #3
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    I always bring my film in when I check in for the night; no exceptions. That's about it. Maybe I would be more careful if I shot more color. I didn't have any problems on my last trip, and there was some color...but then again, that was cross country in Jan., so it never got that hot. Will be heading to Detroit via road this summer, so it will be a consideration for me as well. The last trip, I was more concerned about 5F in Roanoke than 105F in Detroit.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-12-2009 at 12:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    204
    Thanks, guys!

    And yes, I'll definitely be bringing my film inside for the night, primarily for "security" reasons, ahaha. But I just know that I won't always be able to bring it inside during the day. And who knows, I could be out on the road and away from home for weeks.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    Film can tolerate high temperatures..particularly if it is of short duration, such as in the car for several hours. Remember film was the only way to take pictures for 100 years or so. Nobody worried about overheating film. I don't ever recall, in my 50 years ot taking photos of any heat damage to film (color or black and white) from leaving it in the car in summer for a while, like while going to a museum, or eating lunch, etc.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    Film can tolerate high temperatures..particularly if it is of short duration, such as in the car for several hours. Remember film was the only way to take pictures for 100 years or so. Nobody worried about overheating film. I don't ever recall, in my 50 years ot taking photos of any heat damage to film (color or black and white) from leaving it in the car in summer for a while, like while going to a museum, or eating lunch, etc.
    I totally understand. But it's not heat damage that I'm particularly cautioned about. I just want the integrity of the film to last as long as possible; and it's usually recommended that film be refrigerated to ensure better keeping. Plus, I usually operate on the "It's better to be safe than to be sorry" MOD, even if the risk doesn't seem high.

    In any case, I usually keep most of my film refrigerated because I don't always know how soon I'll be using it in advance. And a chunk of the film in my inventory is already expired, and it will likely go with me on some of these trips.

  7. #7
    raucousimages's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Salt Lake
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    825
    I worked at a photo store when I was a kid and when we would unload the truck when our film was delivered in the summer it was hot and in the winter it was cold.No one ever noticed any difference. A foam cooler will help with the heat but don't worry about it too much.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  8. #8
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,891
    Images
    241
    I always figure that I have to keep my film somewhere, and on a long trip I always have a cooler, so why not keep unexposed and exposed film in baggies or better yet, those light plastic gladware type containers you can buy in the grocery store now. I am planning to do some motorcycle traveling this summer, carrying a minimal shooting kit, and am a little concerned about the heat on both film and equipment.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  9. #9
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,689
    Images
    23
    Don't leave your color film in the car unless its in a cooler.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  10. #10
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,383
    Images
    6
    What size film, what quantity?

    When I take the 7x17 off for a week or two, I have boxes of film and loaded film holders in a big cooler. I often take both 7x17 and 8x10, so two big coolers. If I am lucky I use a motel as a base camp. At 69 I have even been known to use room service in my base camp. Slippers may be my approach boots. That means the coolers and the camera gear come in. That means a wheeled dolly. That means a large light colored SUV with tinted windows and air conditioning.

    I am re-reading Edward Weston's Day books. He had quite a bit of trouble with fogged film that he blamed on heat in Mexico in 1923-26, well within the 100 years mentioned above.

    John Powers

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin