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  1. #1
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    The Case for Pyro developer in 400TMY-2?

    PYRO:

    to use it or to not use it, that is the question.......

    I have had very fine results so far in just D-76(actually NACCO Super 76) diluted 1:4(1:1 in D76).

    so far with sheet film while beginning to use a very meager "zone system", i have had no problems so far in my jobo.

    I have never used pyro, in particular PMK Pyro.

    What is it that makes people flock to use it? I haven't seen any noticeable grain even at 16x20 sized prints from 4x5 negs...

    Some insight would be appreciated before i go and plop down 30-40 dollars for the PMK liquid kit at Freestyle.



    p.s. what does the 2-bath development do, other than make exposure times longer and stain the negative? I know you need a non-hardening fixer as well, which one would you reccomend?

    thanks

    dan


  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    If D76 works for you - don't change.

    Why are you investigating a new developer if the one you are already using works for you? If it's for kicks - fine. But try to investigate how you use D76 by varying dilution, agitation, film exposure, and time before you jump ship.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #3
    luis ducoing's Avatar
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    I just tried PMK pyro for the first time, the other developer that I am familiar with is D-76, wich works well for me. I dont know why I wanted to try pyro if I am just learning to use D-76, maybe because I have seen it mentioned in many posts, I used TF-4 fixer and did the second bath in the developer afther the fix like it says in the instructions. most of my negatives came out realy flat and dificult to print. I made the mistake of developing all of the rolls of a weekend trip in PMK, I realy dont know for wich situations you would like this effect. I learned that I am stiking with D-76 untill I have more experience.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10514303@N05/

  4. #4

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    Stay with D76 as per the other posts...you will read many different opinions about the merits and demerits of Pyro. Be prepared to wade through reams of posts....still, as Thomas has said, why change something that works perfectly for you? As someone has mentioned to me several times, you will not be "more of a photographer" just because you use Pyro.

  5. #5
    david b's Avatar
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    If you are looking for something for the sake of something, try TMY2 in xtol 1+1. It is rather nice.

  6. #6
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    If you are looking for something for the sake of something, try TMY2 in xtol 1+1. It is rather nice.
    i'll try that. thanks guys! if anyone else wants to add, please add! =)


  7. #7

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    PMK will give a loss of speed and some effects in printing on VC papers that might be desirable or not, depending on the subject. When printing on VC papers it can produce marvellous detail in highlights that would normally be blown out, such as windows in church interiors, or sunlit waves.

  8. #8
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    I've been shooting TMY2 in 120 and developing in Rodinal using various methods of semi-stand with outstanding results and exposing 1 click under box speed. I expose on the generous side though... Probably the best negatives (technically) I've made so far.

    I have two friends who have been developing it in Pyrocat HD using semi-stand and their prints are beautiful. I've also seen it developed with Pyrocat HD in a tray and that was nice...

    Seems like it's just an incredible film and capable of outstanding results in many different developers. As others have said, probably best to learn it really well with one or two. Of course if it's in the sake of fun and curiosity there's nothing wrong with that either. Best of luck with whatever you decide. Shawn

  9. #9
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    I like 400TMY-2 so much that I after I use up the rest of my B&W films, it will become my mainstay, if not my only, B&W film. (Well, I'll keep some 320TXP and 100TMX on hand, just in case....) Best all-around B&W film I've ever used.

    Looks great in D-76, I think a hair better than it does in Xtol. IMHO. It also looks very good in TMax developer, which I think is underrated (besides being pricey.)

    But if I had to pick only one: D-76.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  10. #10
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    The biggest advantage to pyro developers, imho, is increased accutance. More grain, but sharp as a razor. I mostly contact print, so grain is never an issue.

    If you are going to try it, I would strongly urge you not to use PMK, which has metol in it. This tends to mush things up at the molecular level in order to achieve finer grain, thereby nullifying what I consider to be the major benefit of pyro. I'd choose Pyrocat-HD instead. It's also an excellent pyro developer for anyone who wishes to make negatives which can be both contact printed and enlarged. Get it from Bostick & Sullivan for top-notch quality.

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