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  1. #21
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr5chrome View Post
    ..using a film recorder would involve processing the film as a positive.
    you have B&W slide output or E6 output. Either way the result is superior.
    I do it here at the lab every day. www.filmrecording.net


    dw
    Ok, I see now.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino View Post
    With all due respect, I can't see how taking the negative image through a digital phase will result in a "superior" image; maybe a more convinient process for the lab, but superior? I doubt it.

    Most people have trouble printing good b&w transparencies from still negative images because they are used to the inherent contrast that results from projection printing and the lousy tonal scale of most papers compared to a good film positive.

    As long as the film is in good register, emulsion to emulsion and without slippage during the exposure, you should have fine results. I would suggest a diffuse light source and a thin cover class that is meticulously clean; and I DO MEAN CLEAN.

    Yes, it takes a lot to dial in a system of exposure, but if you are committed and want to do this on a regular basis, you can call the exposure by eye within a 1/2 stop very easily just by looking at the neg (with experience).

    I used to time b&w motion picture film this way; a light table, a pad of paper and a film sync. First answer print was always timed by eye and, more often than not, it was good enough to project and fine tune from the first print.

    No great shakes here, no magic, just lots of experience and lots of printing.

    So, if you don't want to put in the time and effort, and just want a few b&w slides, then maybe the aforementioned method would make more economical sense, but I can tell you with complete confidence, you can make astoundingly beautiful images with a couple of finish nails to register the film, a thin cover glass, a locked down enlarger, time, determination and good note taking.

    Don't be afraid to crank the exposure to the 5302; real timers aren't afraid of the dark...
    If I read the Kodak info correctly the 5302 is blue sensitive only, so you could do everything under a red safe light, and then tray develop the stuff just like paper. Seems to be the best method of doing this, take your roll of the 5302 film, cut off a strip, set up to print like a contact print, then process in a tray like paper. cut it about 3-5cm longer then your film strip and you could do a whole 4 exposure strip at once.

    It's too bad you need to buy 1000' of the stuff, I do wonder though if there are motion picture printers in town, if they use it, whether they would be willing to sell a few feet off the end of a roll. For most of us, 5'-10' would probably do for experimenting. Unless you plan on a lot of slides, 50' would probably be a lifetime supply. Any idea if the stuff can be toned?

    As for digital, it would depend on your projection, if the final projection is digital then scan the negatives or regular prints and work that way. If your using analog projection then stay analog.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  3. #23

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    No need for red; we used the OC equivalent safelight filter. You can easily develop by inspection. While you could go to the trouble of mixing D-97, Dektol should work fine. If you want D-97, the formula is published on the EK website.

    I'd make myself a printing aperture that you can advance the target frame down, so you can do quick exposure tests; a hinged contact glass over a firm back board with a very thin black velvet back and two pins for registration. Since you're working in safelight environment, you can see what you are doing and run less of a risk of damaging your negative.

    Yes it can be toned and tinted; the recipes are quite common on the web for reconstructing silent release prints that were tinted and toned.

    I have several thousand feet of 5302 sitting around here, but finding the time to spool it down is not in the cards for a few weeks as I have a deadline on a film restoration I am doing.

    If you are SERIOUSLY interested, I can spool down 100' for $25 + S&H.

    Its' not a business I really wanted to start, but if you really need it, I can do it.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino View Post
    No need for red; we used the OC equivalent safelight filter. You can easily develop by inspection. While you could go to the trouble of mixing D-97, Dektol should work fine. If you want D-97, the formula is published on the EK website.

    I'd make myself a printing aperture that you can advance the target frame down, so you can do quick exposure tests; a hinged contact glass over a firm back board with a very thin black velvet back and two pins for registration. Since you're working in safelight environment, you can see what you are doing and run less of a risk of damaging your negative.

    Yes it can be toned and tinted; the recipes are quite common on the web for reconstructing silent release prints that were tinted and toned.

    I have several thousand feet of 5302 sitting around here, but finding the time to spool it down is not in the cards for a few weeks as I have a deadline on a film restoration I am doing.

    If you are SERIOUSLY interested, I can spool down 100' for $25 + S&H.

    Its' not a business I really wanted to start, but if you really need it, I can do it.
    Don't know if I would want 100', if I were interested in doing this, which really I am not at the moment, I would want 5' to test first. Honestly though, finding a matched pair of automatic analog projectors would be tough, digital projectors are much easier to find, scan the negatives, process how you like, then create a digital movie, using fading, music and all the other crap that would make a slide show interesting, burn the whole thing to a DVD and it's done. Has the other "advantage" that you could mix 35mm, 120, 4x5, 8x10 negatives into the same "movie". Not sure how to reverse enlarge an 8x10 negative to 35mm...... Not that I have an 8x10 camera, but still.....

    Here in town there are several colleges that have motion picture programs, and a couple of motion picture studios. Like I say you could probably get a few feet somewhere easy enough if you ask around.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Don't know if I would want 100', if I were interested in doing this, which really I am not at the moment, I would want 5' to test first. Honestly though, finding a matched pair of automatic analog projectors would be tough, digital projectors are much easier to find, scan the negatives, process how you like, then create a digital movie, using fading, music and all the other crap that would make a slide show interesting, burn the whole thing to a DVD and it's done. Has the other "advantage" that you could mix 35mm, 120, 4x5, 8x10 negatives into the same "movie". Not sure how to reverse enlarge an 8x10 negative to 35mm...... Not that I have an 8x10 camera, but still.....

    Here in town there are several colleges that have motion picture programs, and a couple of motion picture studios. Like I say you could probably get a few feet somewhere easy enough if you ask around.
    Well whatever... personally, I wouldn't take the time to cram a beautiful film image down a compressed (no doubt) SRGB digital file and then project it with a 8 bit projector designed for power point slides.

    Crap stew, IMHO.

    Anyway, if anyone is serious about needing the 5302, PM me. My time is more valuable that this sort of speculation.

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