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  1. #1
    cmo
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    B/W negatives, a slide copier, what film to make B/W slides?

    For many B/W negatives a second life as a B/W slide would be desirable. Copying a slide is not too difficult from the point of view of a bellows and a macro lens, but what kind of film and process could I use? Do I need a special film or just a special kind of developer?

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    Prest_400's Avatar
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    I think that any negative film would do it. If I'm not wrong, the negative image of another negative is a positive. The developer could be any you wish, though maybe fine grain developer would be a bit better for this kind of fine work.

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    cmo
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    For a good b/w slide I think I will need a lot of contrast - and fine grain. I really wonder what could be a good film/developer combo for this special purpose.

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    Foma makes a reversal black and white film Fomapan R100...
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmo View Post
    I think I will need a lot of contrast...
    oh well, i guess you'll soon wish you never said that--it's getting the contrast down that's tricky

    the results that can be obtained by merging characteristic curves span a mind-boggling range of possibilities--and only your own judgement can guide you. in any case, here's a good starting point:

    http://www.interfoto.fi/ilfordphoto/...it/COPYING.pdf

    some "process" advice:

    batch your originals based on their contrast; the same negative/processing that gives you good results with the muddy ones will produce horrors unspeakable with the contrasty ones

    start with a forgiving film, such as FP4+ or HP5+, pulled two stops

    keep trying, one frame at a time and as long as necessary, until you nail it down; bracket a lot; keep notes

    don't seek perfection; seek interesting reinterpretation
    Last edited by Vilk; 05-15-2009 at 05:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    Robert Kerwin's Avatar
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    There is also Adox Bluefire film, which is microfilm stock cut and packaged in 35mm format that, when developed in a low-contrast developer, will produce images with a full tonal range. It is very fine grained and also has a clear base, which is perhaps better if you're going to project the image. Since the film is inherently high contrast, you might have better luck getting the contrast you need for slides.

    Disclaimer: I haven't tried this film, so I can't give any opinion of how it works; I'm just aware of its existence and wanted to pass along the information.
    "Photograph more, worry less"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Foma makes a reversal black and white film Fomapan R100...
    Ah, but this would a positive of a negative, which is still a negative image.

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    cmo
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    Probably one more detial will be useful: originals are b/w negatives on traditional b/w films. The resulting slides are for projection.

  9. #9
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Kodak 5302 (acetate base) or 2302 (ESTAR base) is what you want. Tech Pan, any ortho film (e.g. ADOX) or very-fine grained films like Efke 25 or TMAX 100, would also work.

    Your negatives must have been developed for projection printing, so they don't have a lot of contrast. To make a decent slide, you need a film that can be developed to a high contrast.

    I use stock Dektol on Kodak 2302 to make slides from normal negatives with a Leitz ELDIA. I found my exposure and developing through trial and error: develop more to augment contrast, and adjust exposure accordingly.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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    The usual technique is to print the negative to a motion picture positive release film (which is sort of like photographic paper). I've tried making 35mm contact prints to Kodak 5302 Fine Grain Release Positive, which is a typical recommendation. I was disappointed with the results, but I didn't try very hard. That film is what the majority of black and white movies were printed on, so good results are definitely possible.

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