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  1. #1

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    Cross processing C-41 with rodinal.

    I recently found out that color negatives can be cross processed in B&W chemistry, so I thought I'd give it a shot and used a 1:50 dilution as well as a 1:25 one with a 10 and 5 minute processing bath.

    The 1:50 10 minutes one came out somewhat OK, but with an extremely low contrast, as well as the film came out red instead of purple/blue like I'm used to with Ilford Delta and Kodak T-Max films, I was able to make some kind of a print, but grey and with an extremely low contrast, I used a 24 shot Kodak Gold 400 film so I tried processing it like T-Max 400.
    The second one, a 1:25 mix with 50 seconds was a slide film: Fuji Sensia 400, this one was even more of a failure since it came out almost completely black with a barely visible image, same problem with the printing, only slightly worse, only able to make prints of extremely low contrast.

    Is there any list or instructions on how to get a more decent image from cross processing negative or slide film with rodinal? I've seen a few examples out there where people get a rather strong contrast using color films for B&W purposes, so there's got to be a way.

    I'm slightly new to analog, so I'd like to know a bit on how to achieve a good deal of contrast through both processing and printing even while using normal B&W film - I noticed that using a higher concentrate with a shorter processing time seemed like one way to achieve this, is this correct?

  2. #2
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    Color negative films from Kodak and Fuji will always have a deep red color when cross processed. No way to fix this.

    PE

  3. #3

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    But is there a way to achieve higher contrast and clearer pictures?
    And are there any other available color films suited for this kind of cross processing?

  4. #4
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    All negative color films have a yellow filter layer and most of them have an orange mask. This renders them dark orange. A better developer might give you higher contrast. Or, use of a reversal film. It would be yellow and foggy but might have more appeal.

    PE

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    All negative color films have a yellow filter layer and most of them have an orange mask. This renders them dark orange. A better developer might give you higher contrast. Or, use of a reversal film. It would be yellow and foggy but might have more appeal.

    PE
    Which developers are better?
    And how do I process slide film in B&W chemicals without ending up with an almost completely black negative?

  6. #6

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    Experiment to get the exposure right. Or do a lot of reading on the net via google and try to sort the wheat from the chaff from what you find, then go back to my first sentence.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Experiment to get the exposure right. Or do a lot of reading on the net via google and try to sort the wheat from the chaff from what you find, then go back to my first sentence.
    I've noticed that some people have changed the film speed to a higher speed, but since I use an F65 I can't do that (I hate it when technology designers treat users like babies!). Will exposure control be able to do the same job like over/underexposing 2-3 steps?

  8. #8

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    Dear Top-Cat,

    You're trying too many things at the same time. Work out your times for the C-41 first, it's fairly easy. Just as you would with a b&w film, you're going to have to bracket your shots to make sure you get a good working exposure index and increase the development time to increase the contrast. I like bracketing full stops. I also like making large changes in time at the beginning. If I were printing using a #5 filter and still got a flat print I would add 50% to my development time. If you are really new to b&w, purchase a good book. Lots of folks recommend "The Negative" by Ansel Adams. It's easy to read but there has to be a more straightforward book out there.

    Any of the Kodak b&w film data sheets will illustrate how the contrast changes with time and he Ilford document http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...0201152306.pdf explains how to adjust contrast in the darkroom.

    My apologies if the information I've provided is obvious to you.

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra

  9. #9

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    Black tape ought to fix the encoding on the film can. Unless there is no other way to set the film speed. I don't know how much manual over ride your camera has, I've never owned any film camera that new.

    The orange mask is not going to help when printing.

  10. #10

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    I believe that you can get strange colors out of C-41 film by first developing it in Rodinal, washing it, then going through with the whole C-41 process. I'm not sure what to search for but you should find it if you look around Google or this site.

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