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  1. #11

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    You can use it for fishing!

    Jeff

  2. #12
    erikg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    *****
    Henceforth, when this happens tell all and sundry you did it on purpose; that this is photographic art with a capital "A:" and that you be a photographic artiste!!
    That sure describes my old prof, hoo boy!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    I had an interesting chat with a Kodak engineer recently who pretty much stated that the gelatin used in T-max films was much harder than normal films so you could process them in any temp with no fear of reticulation and they were less temperature sensitive.
    That said another vote for reticulation...
    I vote reticulation too, but I would be surprised if the Kodak engineer said you could change the temperture greatly between the various fluids. I know that John Sexton develops at 75 degrees F; I'm not sure about TMY2. But he does it because he has trouble in the Summer getting his water temperature down to 68 degrees F.

  4. #14

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    I had it with Tri-X many years back: Kodak asked me to send the bulk-rol back for a free replacement.
    I kept it just for certain shots.

    Peter

  5. #15
    kodachrome64's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry 8300: BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.266 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102)

    Quote Originally Posted by Carter john
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    I had an interesting chat with a Kodak engineer recently who pretty much stated that the gelatin used in T-max films was much harder than normal films so you could process them in any temp with no fear of reticulation and they were less temperature sensitive.
    That said another vote for reticulation...
    I vote reticulation too, but I would be surprised if the Kodak engineer said you could change the temperture greatly between the various fluids. I know that John Sexton develops at 75 degrees F; I'm not sure about TMY2. But he does it because he has trouble in the Summer getting his water temperature down to 68 degrees F.
    That in itself won't hurt TMY because TMY/TMAX Dev is recommended by Kodak at 75 degrees IIRC...
    Kodachrome
    They give us those nice bright colors
    They give us the greens of summers
    Makes you think all the world's a sunny day, oh yeah.
    -Paul Simon

  6. #16
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    That sure describes my old prof, hoo boy!
    ******
    At Rhode Island School of Design, perhaps? I swear, the photographic dinosaur in me makes me cringe at the ARTEESTES. A lot of it, methinks in my jaundiced O.F. view, is just being able to keep a straight face when slinging aft-end-male-bovine-detritus.
    In a slightly different context, I recall an episode in college. I had spent time in the college darkroom printing some informal portraits of a good-looking female college friend.
    I had a botched print which I had thrown in the trash bin. It continued to develop, fogged itself, and did a partial "solarization." For a reason I do not remember, I fixed it, washed it, dried it, and took it with me. Later, when showing the prints to my friend, she fell in love with the ruined print, had it matted and framed, and made me into a real artiste to everyone who saw the print. Go figure.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodachrome64 View Post
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry 8300: BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.266 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102)



    That in itself won't hurt TMY because TMY/TMAX Dev is recommended by Kodak at 75 degrees IIRC...
    It might if your developer is 75℉ and your stop is 55℉
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #18

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    I guess I blew it from reading kodachrome64's post. I should have just said what you; wogster, said.

  9. #19

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    I'll print one of these and see what it looks like through the enlarger. Maybe it is art. ;-)

  10. #20
    erikg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    ******
    At Rhode Island School of Design, perhaps? I swear, the photographic dinosaur in me makes me cringe at the ARTEESTES. A lot of it, methinks in my jaundiced O.F. view, is just being able to keep a straight face when slinging aft-end-male-bovine-detritus.
    In a slightly different context, I recall an episode in college. I had spent time in the college darkroom printing some informal portraits of a good-looking female college friend.
    I had a botched print which I had thrown in the trash bin. It continued to develop, fogged itself, and did a partial "solarization." For a reason I do not remember, I fixed it, washed it, dried it, and took it with me. Later, when showing the prints to my friend, she fell in love with the ruined print, had it matted and framed, and made me into a real artiste to everyone who saw the print. Go figure.
    Sounds like poetic justice of some sort!

    This professor was from well before my time at RISD. He was somewhat well known for the reticulated look in the 70's. I won't embarrass him any further, his work does a pretty good job at that already.

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