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  1. #21

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    And if you use a staining developer and have a choice between graded and VC paper, you effectively have two different curves. The VC paper will introduce a rolloff for dense parts of the negative (because of the filtering effect of the colour of the stain), and the graded paper will not.

  2. #22
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john_s View Post
    And if you use a staining developer and have a choice between graded and VC paper, you effectively have two different curves. The VC paper will introduce a rolloff for dense parts of the negative (because of the filtering effect of the colour of the stain), and the graded paper will not.
    Is that because the stain acts essentially as a grade filter?

    I've not seen this with wd2d+, though I understand its stain is quite different from what you get with many of the more popular pyros.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #23
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    This is probably why you want to overexpose negatives that are developed in Rodinal, to place your shadow values on a straighter portion of the curve. That way you can benefit from the rest of the characteristics of Rodinal.
    The toe of the Rodinal / Tmax comparison, to me, simply indicates a loss in film speed, and is probably the reason why I preferred, for example, Kodak Tmax 100 exposed at an EI of 64 or so when processing in Rodinal.

    After many years of fumbling in the dark, I am finally starting to understand how film developers work, and it seems to me that as you alter agitation (and therefore, indirectly, you alter time) both your midtones AND your highlights are affected by it. The more a particular part of the negative is exposed to light, the more sensitive it becomes to changes in agitation.
    So as you alter the shape of the shoulder by altering agitation, your midtones 'follow'. I don't know if there's a trick to separately treat just the mid-tones, to me they are more indirectly altered by a combination of exposure (metering) and the decisions you make to make sure you get printable highlights.

    - Thomas


    Quote Originally Posted by Usagi View Post
    Rodinal alters the toe that much! That was new to me. Thank you!
    (actually same information is on the on the chart's of the Foto Import site if I take my eye to the hand and look closer)

    Now I have really something to study and test. Should even do some testing with my mostly used films with rodinal, xtol and pyrocat-hd. Then I will be wiser - I hope.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #24

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    I have noticed with 2-bath speed increasing developer Emofin a reduction of highlight contrast.I can't find a curve for Emofin but here is one for Fuji Neopan 400 in Diafine which shows flattening in the highlights compared with Fuji's data for D-76.(Density 0.9-1.2)
    http://www.flikr.com/groups/diafine/...7611458436061/
    http://ivin.info/download/Films/fujifilm_neopan_400.pdf(See p5)

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