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  1. #21
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    The only test I run on the water is to taste it before I use it. If it doesn't cause me to lurch from chlorination (and it seldom does) I do not hesitate to use it.
    Chlorination has been completely abolished here in the Netherlands where Willie-Jan and I live, in favour of treatment with ozone and active coal as additional treatments besides the regular filtration by (dune) sand. Most of the water in the Netherlands is either a clean groundwater source, or river water that has been filtered for several months in natural dune areas, both with extra after-treatment per description above.

    In fact, the water quality and treatments for municipal water here in the Netherlands, is almost an exact copy of what is used to clean up and make drinkable bottled mineral waters.

    Yes, we flush our toilets with high quality mineral water here in the Netherlands

    There are differences in pH and hardness of the water in the Netherlands, although pH regulation is part of the process of making drinking water. River sources tend to have slightly higher pH, than groundwater sources here in Netherlands. My water is pretty hard, and I tended to get soft negatives. Switching to demineralized water (only for mixing up developer) improved this.

    Marco
    Last edited by Marco B; 05-31-2009 at 05:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
    One of the big improvements was to use my fixer as a one-stop.
    Turns out that tiny bits of silver can precipitate out of used fixer,
    and the next time you use that fixer they can stick to the film.
    This was news to me.
    The sodium and ammonium salts of the silver thiosulfate
    complex are soluble. Contaminated water may contain
    elements which may form insoluble silver thiosulfate
    complexes. That is why I always recommend the
    use of demineralized water as a FIRST wash.

    BTW, my long soak way of washing prints uses so little
    water as to allow the use of distilled. Dan

  3. #23
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I've always used tap water for the vast majority of my processing. The only exceptions are that I've used either distilled or RO-filtered water to dilute photoflo, and I keep a jug of distilled water to dilute Na2 solution for Pt/Pd printing.

    I will say, however, that many years ago I did a lot of Cibachrome printing. I noticed a distinct color shift around the time we got a water softener in our home. In fact, I wasn't able to recalibrate the filter pack required to achieve a neutral color balance after that change, and eventually just gave up on Cibachrome. We know that a water softener reduces the calcium and magnesium content in the water, and slightly increases the sodium content, and I suspect (but can't prove) that the change in water chemistry may have been the cause of the color shift.
    Louie

  4. #24

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    I live in Germany and I started out using tap water exclusively and soon after changed my ways. All of my film ended up with large amounts of hard water spots and I tried numerous ways to make go away and the only thing that worked was buying distilled water. I use rodinal and pyrocat hd as developers and they seem to work well with distilled water.

    ./e

  5. #25
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    I think the best way is to do a test to see if there is any difference than....

    thanks.

  6. #26

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    I am a biochemist by trade, and so I tend to be a bit obsessive about making up solutions. Since I have a ready supply of very pure water, I use that for all of my film-developing solutions, where you only get one chance. If nothing else, it helps ensure consistency.

    My suggestion would be to use distilled or deionized water for developer solutions, especially for diluting highly concentrated stock solutions with little pH buffering capacity - Rodinal is a good example.

    What I am pretty sure will not work is boiling water to remove calcium or other minerals. These are not volatile and will just get more concentrated as you boil off water. It is possible that this would cause some minerals to precipitate so that they would settle or could be removed by filtering. Boiling will reduce chlorine or oxygen. Removing oxygen will help the stability of the stock solution.

    David

  7. #27

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    David - Welcome!

    We need more people with science backgrounds here.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  8. #28
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    Thanks David.

    Did you see a difference using the normal and pure water?

  9. #29
    clayne's Avatar
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    You know what I'd like to see scientifically proven or debunked? If particulate matter is capable of being "embedded" into the emulsion during the development process (any part of it). Has always seemed somewhat sketchy to me - even though I have plenty of negs where it sure looks that way!
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #30

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    Dunno but intuitively filtering the tap water out with some kind of micrometer mesh filter and then adding 1g or 2g/lt od EDTA seems more than sufficient to me, not considering that commercial products already contain sequestring agents...

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