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  1. #1
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Packfilm Negative

    This is probably a longshot, but, upon processing my last Fuji 3000 packfilm shot, I noticed that the negative was clearly visible. Would it be possible to stop and fix this negative? Then I assume you'd have to remove it from the opaque sheet of plastic. Is this possible?

  2. #2

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    Probably not, as the opaque sheet is probably the backing that the negative emulsion is coated on (665/55 film wasn't). But heck, you could try! If you do, let us know how it turns out.

  3. #3
    wildbill's Avatar
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    let it dry and scan it. that's your best bet.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #4
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    Definitely worth experimenting with, cant hurt. From memory Polaroid-type material uses monobath chemistry, developer and fixer in with one another, so I'm not sure what effect extra fixing would have.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  5. #5
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I fixed the negative overnight and it only served to remove what image there was...

    Aren't there techniques used to move images from nitrate film base to acetate like floating in water?

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    I tried floating it on a piece of glass with a well of tape around the glass on my scanner. And I got nothing different. But on Flickr there are a few references to these FujiFP100b 'negatives' being use to make positives.

  7. #7
    keithwms's Avatar
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    You might try contact printing your positive to ortho film. The resulting neg might be acceptable for contact prints and small enlargements.

    With the fuji colour packfilm fp00c, you can boil the print and float the emulsion off and then do whatever with that. But in my experience, the image won't float off the fp100b at all.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #8
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Polaroid made 665 film, which gave a fully usable negative and print. I wish I had some of it! I usually press all of the negatives onto watercolor paper (any paper will work) when I peel the print back. I develop for the correct time and get a great print and then I put the negative onto paper for about a minute and press it down and roll something round that I can find around me on it for about a minute and I pull it off the paper to find a neat image. I know many people do this, but many ruin the print when doing this because they alter the development times, but I see no need for that. After all, I shoot Polaroid for the prints. Well, happy Polaroiding
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time



 

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