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  1. #1

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    Anyone know where to find RELIABLE Crawley FX formulas?

    Is there a place where we can find genuine reliable formulas for Geoffrey Crawley's FX series?

    The reason why I ask is that I went looking for FX-15 following on from an earlier thread. Googling for the formula is easy and gives plenty of hits...

    So far I have found three different formulas

    They all have the same ingredients - but have different values for Phenidone and Sulphite. They all make up to 1 ltr - so it isn't a proportions issue. It could be an anydrous / crystal difference with the Sulphite, but the formulas don't say which to use, which isn't helpful - but I can't see any justification for different values of phenidone?

    I think it is just that at least 2 of the three must be wrong - possibly all three! :rolleyes:

    Does anyone know of a source of reliable data?

    Thanks.
    Steve

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Crawley published them all in the British Journal of Photography in 1960/1, and repeated them in the PJP Almanac/Annuals until recently, a few are more recent like FX37.

    The Formula for Acutol-S FX-15 was only published after it was dropped from production by Paterson, but I've seen more than one version, Crawley did modify some of his formulae over the years.

    FX15 Acutol S


    Metol 3.5g
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 100g
    Phenidone 0.1g
    Hydroquinone 2.25g
    Sodium Metabisulphite 0.5g
    Borax 2.5g
    Sodium Carbonate (anhyd) 1g
    Potassium Bromide 1.5g
    Water to 1 litre

    Hope that helps

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 06-04-2009 at 07:17 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Is that the order to mix (I assume start with 750cc water), Ian? If so I'l put it on CiM.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It would be the order I'd mix it.

    Ian

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Thank you, Ian.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  6. #6

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    A good (?) source for these might be Anchell & Troop's "Film Developing Cookbook."

  7. #7
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    A good (?) source for these might be Anchell & Troop's "Film Developing Cookbook."
    FX-15 there matches Ian's posting with one common substitution:

    0.5 g of Sodium Bisulfite rather than 0.5 g Sodium Metabisulfite

    Lee

  8. #8
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    According to the latest information from 1932, it would be better to dissolve the Metol first in a small amount of plain water. Metol is acid enough in this solution to prevent its own oxidation. If you add sulfite before adding the hydroquinone, any oxidized Metol will be converted to a less active sulfonate form. If the hydroquinone along with a small amount of the sulfite is added before the bulk of the sulfite, the oxidized Metol is regenerated. This advice comes from 2 redoubtable Kodak warriors, Hardy and Perrin, in their text book "Principles of Optics." It was applied there to D-76, but should apply to any MQ developer. If for some reason you would like to substitute sodium ascorbate for hydroquinone, it may be added directly to the Metol solution, as the ascorbate regenerates oxidized Metol without sulfite.
    Gadget Gainer

  9. #9

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    Pat - Hardy and Perrin aside, a pinch of sulfite, added before the metol is added to the solution, will consume the small amount of oxygen dissolved in the water. (Cool water will have only about 8-10 mg/L of dissolved oxygen.) Since there is very little oxygen left in the water after the sulfite dissolves, there will be nothing there to oxidize the metol.

    So which approach is better?
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The pinch of sulphite first does help the metol to dissolve, but then with a commercially packaged developer like D76 everything is already mixed together before you dissolve them. So it's not essential.

    Ian

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