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  1. #31
    Ade-oh's Avatar
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    Complete light-tightness is difficult to achieve in a home darkroom but it isn't entirely necessary either. My darkroom is in my garage and it has proved difficult to completely prevent light leaking in around the door but this doesn't affect my prints at all.

    Mind you having said that, I do most of my printing on winter evenings when there is no light outside to affect things and I develop film in my kitchen using a changing bag to load the tanks.

  2. #32
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    If the preflashed test comes out ok (preflash, then object on paper for twice the time it takes you to make a print) you are good to go. It is good to repeat periodically and whenever you bring a new paper into the darkroom.

  3. #33

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    The easiest way to lightproof a room is to use cardboard in the windows. Go to your local ABC store and get a few boxes, tape them together (you could even double-up on the cardboard for a window that is in direct sunlight and you're worried) and tape it up using gaff tape or duct tape.

    An earlier poster suggested using a huge amount of red gel to cover a window. I don't think that would work, as even proper safelights suggest keeping them at least 2 feet from paper at all times. I would think that much light (even if it were filtered red) would pose a fogging risk.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    The easiest way to lightproof a room is to use cardboard in the windows. Go to your local ABC store and get a few boxes, tape them together (you could even double-up on the cardboard for a window that is in direct sunlight and you're worried) and tape it up using gaff tape or duct tape.
    It all depends on how multi-purpose the room is, and what kind of ventilation you have. Some people have dark rooms in bathrooms and laundry rooms, so whatever is over the window must be removable. What I did one time was this:

    I had one window in a laundry room to deal with, I got a piece of plywood, cut it the right size, painted it grey on both sides. Added some weather stripping, and then 2 hinges at the top, and a bolt at the bottom. When closed even bright sun didn't get in. I had a second latch from a bolt on the ceiling, so I could raise it up, slide the bolt and it would stay up.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  5. #35

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    Wogster:

    Good point. For a temporary darkroom I think cardboard and gaff tape would be a good solution. I use it in my full time darkroom as well. It's cheap, light, and doesn't wear out over time like plastic and blackout cloth can do.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    Wogster:

    Good point. For a temporary darkroom I think cardboard and gaff tape would be a good solution. I use it in my full time darkroom as well. It's cheap, light, and doesn't wear out over time like plastic and blackout cloth can do.
    Cardboard can get wet though if the humidity is higher and the temperature drops outside, then it turns to mush. You can protect it with a layer of plastic sheeting, but it looks really ugly. If it's a window that faces a wall in close proximity it may be okay. If it's visible from the street, then you may want a different option. The problem with gaffer or duct tape is that the glue residues can be a bear to remove, more so if they have been there for a while.

    For the nicest looking from the outside, paint the wood black, put a small block of wood in the corners facing the window so that it sits slightly in from the window frame. Put the weather striping around the edge. Get a piece of sheer cloth twice the width of the window and staple that to your piece of wood, at the top not flat though, you want it to look like a curtain from the outside. It will look like the room is not in use, the curtains are closed and the lights are off.
    Last edited by wogster; 06-17-2009 at 11:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    It all depends on how multi-purpose the room is, and what kind of ventilation you have. Some people have dark rooms in bathrooms and laundry rooms, so whatever is over the window must be removable. What I did one time was this:

    I had one window in a laundry room to deal with, I got a piece of plywood, cut it the right size, painted it grey on both sides. Added some weather stripping, and then 2 hinges at the top, and a bolt at the bottom. When closed even bright sun didn't get in. I had a second latch from a bolt on the ceiling, so I could raise it up, slide the bolt and it would stay up.
    Very similar to what I am going to do in my laundry/dark room. I have very recessed casement windows in that room so plenty of space to stuff something. I'm going to have plywood cut about 3/4" smaller than the window opening then use that split round pipe insulating foam around the plywood. Attach a handle in the middle so I can get it back out of the window frame then just stuff it in place.

    The two doors I have to deal with both have windows also (one to kitchen, the other to outside) but they are metal clad doors, so some heavy black plastic and a few magnets will solve that problem.

    No modifications to the house and everything should tuck nicely into a corner when not in use.

  8. #38
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Plywood, cut to the shape of the window. Added a handle. Covered the window side with blackout cloth. Fits into the window blocking out most of the light. A little tape to hold up the cloth where the light comes around and the room is dark.

    I described in an earlier post how I deal with the doors.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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