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  1. #1
    sidearm613's Avatar
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    Light Proofing a Door Jamb

    So, I'm most of the way through setting up a darkroom in my bathroom. It is well ventilated, I'm going to put some blackout cloth on my window, so that leaves the door jamb. Because of the dual purpose of my dark/bathroom, I need something that can be changed relatively quickly, so relatives may relieve themselves after I'm done printing (read: kicked out) I am pretty open to ideas, but considering that my house is very old, and I am not the owner, I want a light proof solution that is relatively non-intrusive, so having velcro strips running up my door(s) really is a no-go. The darkroom in my school has these fuzzy, black strips on the inside of the jamb so that when the door closes it forms a light tight seal, and if anybody knows what I'm talking about and where to find them, it would be greatly appreciated. Aside from that, any good ideas?

    P.S. - How about the window as well... any better ideas than blackout cloth and thumb tacks?

    thanks a lot
    David

    A Holga is an ugly woman, a Brownie is a delicious treat.

    dromanophoto.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Try some weather stripping:

    Here is a link to an item at Home Depot in Washington state.

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...egoryID=502027

    It is available in different colours, but it should not be necessary to use black.

    Matt

  3. #3

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    An old black or navy blue towel might do the trick; easy to put in, easy to remove and low cost. Or black cloth from the fabric store?

  4. #4
    sidearm613's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    An old black or navy blue towel might do the trick; easy to put in, easy to remove and low cost. Or black cloth from the fabric store?
    But my family uses bright, happy colored towels!
    David

    A Holga is an ugly woman, a Brownie is a delicious treat.

    dromanophoto.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    It could be white for that matter. It just needs to be portable and able to block light from without, right?
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  6. #6
    sidearm613's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    It could be white for that matter. It just needs to be portable and able to block light from without, right?
    exactly, and in fact, it doesnt even need to be portable, just non-intrusive. My house is almost 90 year old, so it would be a shame to cover the original woodwork with tack holes, no? If possible, I would like it to be capable of being so light tight that I can print color. I'm only doing B/W so far, but my enlarger has a dichro head, so I want to keep the options open.
    David

    A Holga is an ugly woman, a Brownie is a delicious treat.

    dromanophoto.blogspot.com/

  7. #7

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    I used regular rubber weather stripping purchased at Home Depot. It's adhesive so there are no tack holes.

  8. #8

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    What I've done in the past is to use a black bin liner, cut into strips, and these strips were pinned to one side (the door, or the bit that the door fits into) folded over in loops, where the loop flops over the crack. This was effective, and easy to take down at a later date (much later). I think it's better to cover the crack externally than to try and run something down into the crack itself.

  9. #9
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    Light really does not need much of a 'maze' to be blocked from coming thru the door! I used a second bedroom as a color darkroom for my 4x5 enlarger, and to load the exposed print paper into a Jobo tank. I simply tacked an opaque cloth over the doorway outside in the hall, draping onto the carpet, then I would close the door. It worked fine, even in the day.

  10. #10

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    Use the top of the door frame. No one will ever see it. One layer of an opaque cloth outside and one inside will be way more than enough.

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