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  1. #11
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I'm assuming you are going to be printing some post cards, hence the cutting question.

    Well all advice received so far is correct regarding cutting. The Ilford MG IV Pearl paper you have is as tough as boots and can handle very bad handling as easy as pie, do whatever is easiest to dry it. You can lay prints face up on towels, then cover with a cotton tea towel to absorb moisture from the emulsion, this is a really quick and simple way to do loads of prints. Once they are relatively dry, you can stand them up against a wall, box or whatever to allow complete drying to occur.

    Using a squeegee on this paper you should have no problems, I use one. Unless your squeegee rubber lips are full of grit, that is.

    You can also dry with a hair dryer, failing that get a hot air gun from the garage, they are brilliant but be careful you don't burn your fingers.

    On the subject of drying and developing once you have selected you negative(s). Do an extra long development say 2 minutes instead of 1 minute and a bit, wash then dry this print. You may notice a slight change in the density (darkness or lightness) of the print. If you use this print as a guide for correct exposure, you should be alright.

    With multiple prints being done at the one time from the same negative it is really easy to start to develop for longer than your initial test, this will give you a darker than you wish for print. Do not be afraid of over developing, basically and within reason, you cannot over develop a print.

    I'm not sure if you on my exchange list, if so I look forward to your print.

    Mick.

  2. #12
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    1. What do you mean by "cut"? If I am cutting large sheets into smaller sheets (eg, 11x14 sheets down to two 7x10 sheets), then I always do that before printing. But I don't mind printing on an oversized sheet and trimming later.

    2. Wetting agent is only used with film. In fact, if you are using RC paper, you can even eliminate the hypoclear step.

    3. I agree that one should never squeegee film, but I don't see anything wrong with squeeging prints. That said, I also make a point of keeping by squeegee scrupulously clean. With RC paper, you can dry face up - that speeds drying. With FB paper you need to dry face down to manage curl.
    Louie

  3. #13
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    Thanks for the advice guys! Mixed as always, but I have taken away what I needed!

    And Mick, at this stage, you are 100% correct. It is for my postcard challenge at this stage, but that being said, I would rather buy bigger paper cheaper and cut to size where possible.

    I am interested by the "Photo on Life Support" comment about RC papers. I am assuming that you mean RC papers have a tendancy to fade quicker then Fibre. Is that correct? Out of interests sake, what type of life expectancy would you expect out of a non toned RC print (I know that there are varying factors, but lets say, stored in an archival album.)? Toning is something that I want to work with later, but as they say, walk before you run!

    Now I need to find a paper cutter. I am assuming Rotary cutters probably do a better job?

    Cheers

  4. #14
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Thanks for the advice guys! Mixed as always, but I have taken away what I needed!

    And Mick, at this stage, you are 100% correct. It is for my postcard challenge at this stage, but that being said, I would rather buy bigger paper cheaper and cut to size where possible.

    I am interested by the "Photo on Life Support" comment about RC papers. I am assuming that you mean RC papers have a tendancy to fade quicker then Fibre. Is that correct? Out of interests sake, what type of life expectancy would you expect out of a non toned RC print (I know that there are varying factors, but lets say, stored in an archival album.)? Toning is something that I want to work with later, but as they say, walk before you run!

    Now I need to find a paper cutter. I am assuming Rotary cutters probably do a better job?

    Cheers
    I don't get the life support comment either.

    I think a lot of the poor quality and fading prints problems, are from the earliest days of RC paper, when there were issues. Of course the manufacturers solved those problems more then 30 years ago.

    I have some prints I made in 1979, so they are 30 years old, a mix of fibre and RC paper. I used FB at home for a while and RC at school, I couldn't tell the difference other then the FB papers were a bear to dry flat, so I switched to the RC paper at home as well. I still have some of those early prints, and they still look nice today, even though for most of the time they were stored in less then ideal conditions. I couldn't really tell the difference then, and I can't tell the difference now.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    I don't get the life support comment either.

    I think a lot of the poor quality and fading prints problems, are from the earliest days of RC paper, when there were issues. Of course the manufacturers solved those problems more then 30 years ago.

    I have some prints I made in 1979, so they are 30 years old, a mix of fibre and RC paper. I used FB at home for a while and RC at school, I couldn't tell the difference other then the FB papers were a bear to dry flat, so I switched to the RC paper at home as well. I still have some of those early prints, and they still look nice today, even though for most of the time they were stored in less then ideal conditions. I couldn't really tell the difference then, and I can't tell the difference now.
    Take them out of dark storage and display them for a year then assess them, you may see a big difference.
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Thanks for the advice guys! Mixed as always, but I have taken away what I needed!

    And Mick, at this stage, you are 100% correct. It is for my postcard challenge at this stage, but that being said, I would rather buy bigger paper cheaper and cut to size where possible.

    I am interested by the "Photo on Life Support" comment about RC papers. I am assuming that you mean RC papers have a tendancy to fade quicker then Fibre. Is that correct? Out of interests sake, what type of life expectancy would you expect out of a non toned RC print (I know that there are varying factors, but lets say, stored in an archival album.)? Toning is something that I want to work with later, but as they say, walk before you run!

    Now I need to find a paper cutter. I am assuming Rotary cutters probably do a better job?

    Cheers
    You really need to read Ctein, the book is 'Post Exposure'
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Regarding paper cutters, I have and do use both types, but for working under safelight, I prefer the guillotine type.

    Matt

  8. #18
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    I like laundry hooks. I just clip them on the very corner of the paper and hang them on a clothes line I have stretched across the end of my darkroom. If they do leave a mark, it's in the very corner and will be covered by the mat anyway.
    I have also used plain wood spring clothes pins. I drill one leg and make a hook from some 14ga copper wire. Works great.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails laundryhook.jpg  
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  9. #19
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Layne View Post
    Take them out of dark storage and display them for a year then assess them, you may see a big difference.
    Mark
    Can't see why, it's the same emulsion on the surface.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #20
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    A rotary cutter is a safer proposition with regards to getting consistent straight trimming every time, generally.

    I have ½ a dozen rotary cutters and two guillotine ones. The guillotine cutters have a tendency to pull paper towards the blade unless you hold the paper quite tightly, technique is where it is at really.

    The type of cutter you choose will more than likely be one from the Reject Shop for about $10.00, it's the type that I started out with many years ago.

    Mick.

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