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  1. #1

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    Extreme grain on purpose.

    Hi, first post here!

    I'm fairly new to film, and i mostly shoot colour slide, and am slightly stepping into Black and White.

    I'm going to a music festival next week (Hellfest, a metal festival in clisson), and i'm planning to take some pictures of bands, i'd like to use a BW film for that which is Very Grainy for that purpose, i did think about the Ilford 3200 film, but with the concerts in daylight i cant imagine that be really usable, altough i could shoot *everything* at f/22 ofcourse.

    Would using a ISO 100 or such film and underexposing + 2 stop push processing work similiarly?

    I cant develop myself, and i'm not sure if the store i have develop my film does push processing.

    So, shoot!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by locutus View Post
    Hi, first post here!

    I'm fairly new to film, and i mostly shoot colour slide, and am slightly stepping into Black and White.

    I'm going to a music festival next week (Hellfest, a metal festival in clisson), and i'm planning to take some pictures of bands, i'd like to use a BW film for that which is Very Grainy for that purpose, i did think about the Ilford 3200 film, but with the concerts in daylight i cant imagine that be really usable, altough i could shoot *everything* at f/22 ofcourse.

    Would using a ISO 100 or such film and underexposing + 2 stop push processing work similiarly?

    I cant develop myself, and i'm not sure if the store i have develop my film does push processing.

    So, shoot!

    Absolutely not. Exposing a ISO 100 film at +2 stops will change grain very little.

    Are you able to scan the film? If so, and if what you want is big grain, get the highest speed color film you can find, scan it and then choose the channel with the largest size grain. Depending on your scanner this will probably be the Red or Blue channel. After that, just add grain with the grain filter in Photoshop if the film does not give you enough.

    This is perhaps not an APUG solution, but I think it is a good solution for what you want to do.

    You might ask more details on the hybrid forum if interested.

    Sandy

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by locutus View Post
    Hi, first post here!

    I'm fairly new to film, and i mostly shoot colour slide, and am slightly stepping into Black and White.

    I'm going to a music festival next week (Hellfest, a metal festival in clisson), and i'm planning to take some pictures of bands, i'd like to use a BW film for that which is Very Grainy for that purpose, i did think about the Ilford 3200 film, but with the concerts in daylight i cant imagine that be really usable, altough i could shoot *everything* at f/22 ofcourse.

    Would using a ISO 100 or such film and underexposing + 2 stop push processing work similiarly?

    I cant develop myself, and i'm not sure if the store i have develop my film does push processing.

    So, shoot!
    in this next week, i would find a film you want to use, and do a ton of tests ..
    bracket exposures and shoot as many rolls as you can ... process it in
    a what used to be called a "universal" developer
    meaning it could be used for prints as well as film. ( like agfa 125, or kodak d72 )
    find a photo lab index or ask for dilutions, forumulas and starting points of development
    then process another roll in the same developer, in a different dilution and agitate your film
    a different way ( or don't agitate at all ). then do another roll
    and process it in the same developer, but another way .. make sure you have notes so you know
    what you did ...
    then you can stick your film in an enlarger or do whatever you
    want with it and examine how your grain looks.

    it isn't really an easy thing to just say use this film, expose your film a certain way
    and process it in a certain developer and you will get grain.
    what one person things is grainy, another might think is nothing much.
    not only that people process their film using different methods or agitation .. so
    what might work for one person might not work for another ..

    good luck, and have fun experimenting!
    john


    ps .. im not sure what kind of camera you are using, but you can also use a half frame or smaller
    frame camera and enlarge your negative - - more - - this will make your grain more apparent too..
    Last edited by jnanian; 06-11-2009 at 07:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  4. #4

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    My grand daughter has a Barbie 110 that'll give you all the big grain you want, and some.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Make a matchbox 35mm pinhole camera and have so much grain you can bake bread. There's how to in the April issue of the magazine. It would certainly be an attention getter and a good conversation piece.

    And welcome to APUG.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  6. #6
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    The Delta 3200 will work fine in any light. I love the way it looks when shot in strong daylight. Everything is frozen in motion and equally sharp, which looks very neat combined with the wash of grain over the whole picture. As an added benefit, it is a very flat film, so it handles the high-contrast light more easily than slower films. Remember that it is an ISO 1000 film. 3200 is just a usable EI for the film. This means that on a perfectly clear, nice and bright day, '1000 at f/16 or an equivalent exposure, such as '4000 at f/8. Also, do not fear overexposing this film if you want a slower shutter speed or less depth of field. It will handle it just fine, and it will actually increase the graininess.

    I shoot lots of concerts, and more depth of field and faster shutter speeds are the last things I would complain about with this sort of photo work. I would be glad to be able to shoot at '1000 or '2000 for a live show, but I am generally lucky if the light will allow '125 at f/1.2 at EI 8000.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 06-11-2009 at 08:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

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  7. #7

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    Hi!

    I'll be taking my Nikon F90 + 28-70 f/2.6 along, and i'll be shooting at a really busy festival, so while a homebrewn pinhole camera would be a nice idea, its not really doable (to fragile and such), also pinhole would have way to long exposure time for action shots :-)

    What i did think about, was getting the Delta 3200 film, use a EI of 800, and then have it processed at ISO3200.

    Anyone tried doing that?

    Also, about developing yourself, i dont really have the materials for that yet, nor would i want to start off experimenting that much on these shots, and i'll be leaving next thuesday, so not to much experimentation time (and a busy weekend on top!).

    Thanks for the replies already!

  8. #8

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    In general, minimum grain comes with the minimum exposure for adequate shadow detail. Overexposure yields more grain. Since you can't do your own processing, using a film like Tri-X and over exposing by a stop or two should give you good grain.
    That much exposure will be easy to accomplish in daylight, perhaps even hard to avoid.
    I'd think a lab that does B&W should be able to push if you want.

    If it's available for you a film like Ilford SFX (iso 200) will give you a grainy look without quite the speed of Tri-X. It will be much more grainy than something like Plus-X or FP4 (IMO).

  9. #9
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    I would rather have it processed at EI800. Process it at 3200 and it could be grossly overexposed. The extra processing would enlarge the size of the grain and is, in fact, a popular means of acheiving exposure at EI800. You definitely have the right idea, I think.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by locutus View Post
    Hi!What i did think about, was getting the Delta 3200 film, use a EI of 800, and then have it processed at ISO3200.!
    What that does is pretty much expose it at its true EI, then pushes the highlights and midtones in development. This can be good for flat cases in which you want the shadows to be fairly high in tone (darkish greys instead of black or near black), while also raising the relative tones of the brighter areas (i.e. contrast). I would not do it in contrasty light, though.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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