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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silverhead View Post
    Or you could use brown beer bottles as well--the big European ones with stoppers attached. That way you can store your chemistry and have a good old time before you get in the darkroom too
    That's usually the first chemical to get opened in the darkroom

  2. #42
    RJS
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    Has anyone else had the delightful experience of spilling all those wonderful marbles on the floor and then trying to explain to the orthopedic people why in the world you did that?

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by RJS View Post
    Has anyone else had the delightful experience of spilling all those wonderful marbles on the floor and then trying to explain to the orthopedic people why in the world you did that?
    I've had enough people tell me I've lost my marbles over the years that the doctors would just be happy I found them!!!

  4. #44
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    Pete -

    In general, I don't bother with accordion bottles.

    The theory behind accordion bottles is that some chemicals (especially developers) will oxydize when left in contact with air, and an accordion bottle allows you to squeeze much of the air and minimize that problem.

    For the last few years I've been using liquid concentrate in one quart bottles - they don't come in accordion bottles and seem to last reasonably well as long as I keep up a reasonable rhythm of darkroom work. By the way, the plastic that is used to make the bottles that concentrates come in is much heavier than the plastic used to make accordion bottles. That tells you something.

    I think there would be more of a problem with working solutions, but my approach is to use those as one-shot solutions.

    By the way, if you think that you have a problem with oxidation, there are three other tricks that you can consider. One is to squirt the gas that is used to prevent oxidation of wine into the bottle before closing it. Another trick is to simply drop glass marbles into the bottle to displace volume. And if you are concerned about oxidation, you need to store the solution in a glass bottle rather than plastic.
    Louie

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