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  1. #11
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I use a relaxed version of the Ilford method.
    Twixt water changes and some agitation each
    I find time to do some clean up. Little water
    is used. I keep a jug of room temperature
    ready for the purpose.
    I do just about the same thing. I don't bother with the jug of room temperature water though. However it comes out of the tap is fine for me.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  2. #12

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    The old rule of thumb was to wash film 30 minutes in running water. I usually take the top off the tank, stick a funnel in the fill tube and put it under a slowly running tap. Hypo clearing agent is not strictly needed, but it can help insure that all the fixer products are washed out, and it can reduce the wash times. By the way, most people feel that the Ilford wash method is insufficient to guarantee archival permanence with all water conditions.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    The old rule of thumb was to wash film 30 minutes
    in running water. ...
    By the way, most people feel that the Ilford wash
    method is insufficient to guarantee archival
    permanence with all water conditions.
    I'd be more concerned with the emulsions exposure
    to 30 minutes of running water of questionable quality.

    Better than 50%, "most people", may not use the
    Ilford 5-10-20 wash routine, but few doubt it's
    ability to deliver a very good wash.

    The sequence is a time and water saver. With Good
    quality water, which ANY film wash requires, there
    is no need to worry.

    To bolster the sequence, as I've mentioned, I do
    not hurry it. Also room temperature water is
    some additional insurance. Dan

  4. #14
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    As I mentioned earlier I use 5-10-20 and I actually timed it the other night and I got through it in under three minutes, forget the exact time. But it is great for productivity and savings in resources.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #15

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    ...and absolutely, room temperature water will wash things out faster than straight cold tap water. No doubt about it.
    Frank Schifano

  6. #16

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    Why not a 5-5-5 sequence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    As I mentioned earlier I use 5-10-20 and I actually timed
    it the other night and I got through it in under three minutes,
    forget the exact time. But it is great for productivity and
    savings in resources.
    I believe the 5-10-20 sequence is Ilford's way of saying
    that more time is needed for diffusion of fixer outward
    from the emulsion as less and less of it remains in the
    emulsion. On an atomic scale the last of the fixer is
    deeply located.

    A 5-5-5 sequence will work just as well as long as
    the amount time with each change of water is
    increased.

    The first short wash removes primarily surface
    clinging fixer. The later washes are waiting
    for that deep down fixer to surface.

    I wouldn't rush it. My strictly followed 5-10-20
    wash routine ran about 5 to 6 minutes. Now a film
    wash runs me about 10 minutes. The wash takes more
    time but I spend less time performing the wash. Dan

  7. #17
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    The old rule of thumb was to wash film 30 minutes in running water. I usually take the top off the tank, stick a funnel in the fill tube and put it under a slowly running tap. Hypo clearing agent is not strictly needed, but it can help insure that all the fixer products are washed out, and it can reduce the wash times. By the way, most people feel that the Ilford wash method is insufficient to guarantee archival permanence with all water conditions.
    Which is fine when water is very plentiful and cheap. However in more and more places water is getting less and less plentiful, and the cost of that water is getting more and more expensive. You would be amazed at the amount of water you can go through in a short period of time, letting a tap run for 30 minutes, even at a fairly slow rate of flow.

    The Ilford method can be extended and many people do, I usually do 5-10-20-20 (the second one is done much slower though). IIRC That method was developed just after WWII when England had a water shortage. The real proof isn't in how much fixer is left in the emulsion, it's how many negatives that were processed using it in the 1940's and 1950's that are still in perfect condition today.

    Considering that today we often use rapid fixers that fix in less time and can be washed out easier, a method that worked in the 1950's with old style fixers, should work even better today with modern fixers.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #18
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cesrig View Post
    What's the deal with fixer remover and film? Is it necessary/depend on the fixer? I'm definitely not going to be using Sprint stuff while I'm home - - -
    Hypoclear is not essential, but it's use can reduce that amount of washing required after film is processed. Alternatively, its use can provide an extra margin of comfort that your film has been processed as archivally as possible.

    I'm curious about the statement that you are 'definitely not going to be using Sprint stuff' at home. In most areas today, processing chemicals are rather hard to find, and the cost of purchasing them from a remote supplier and paying for shipping and possibly hazmat charges is unappealing. Where I live, there is only a couple of stores that carry processing chemicals on any consistent basis, and the one brand that I have been able to find regularly is Sprint. Yes, Sprint have made their name on educational use of their product, but the stuff works, and more importantly, its available. My point is that I wouldn't arbitrarily rule out Sprint.
    Louie

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto View Post
    Hypoclear is not essential, but it's use can reduce that amount
    of washing required after film is processed. Alternatively, its use
    can provide an extra margin of comfort that your film has been
    processed as archivally as possible.
    It's the fixer with it's load of silver which needs to be washed
    out. The less fixer and silver to start the quicker the wash and
    the less water needed. I use fixer VERY dilute one-shot.

    A 120 roll through 500ml of just prepared, pristine,
    very dilute fixer, guarantees extremely low silver levels.
    Fresh chemistry is the only way for me to work because
    I've only a few rolls each year to process.

    FB paper is also processed with very dilute one-shot
    chemistry. Washes consume VERY little water. Dan

  10. #20

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    If I'm developing several rolls of film, I usually mix up a batch of HCA simply to cut down on wash time. If I'm only developing one roll in the foreseeable future, I don't mix any up. It isn't necessary, but makes things go faster.

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