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  1. #1
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    I was thinking about getting some Rollei IR film for freestyle. I have HC110 and some Arista film developer. Would I need any different? What about handling, filtration, anything an IR newb would need to know when I do it.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I use two different filters with the Rollei: a 72 and a #87. You might also like to experiment with a deep red filter. My typical filter factors are:

    red: 2-4 stops
    72: 5-8 stops
    87: 10-14 stops

    The ranges just depend on the time of the day and the season, altitude, what kind of clouds are present, etc. What I had for breakfast, the colour of my socks etc. Bracket like nuts until you get the hang of it. If shooting sheet film then shoot two of everything, develop the first, and use that result to amend the development time for the second.

    Developers.... well I haven't used the HC110, I use ID11 (D76) 1+1 all the time and have no complaints. I have also used xtol and perceptol with it, no problems.

    The film can be loaded and unloaded in subdued light e.g. under a jacket if you're outside. There are no other special concerns about handling and the film keeps well for many months on the shelf.

    Consider also the new Rollei superpan, which I like very much and which has quite similar IR sensitivity.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    P.S. Though it is a near-IR film, there is still some IR refocus with the Rollei. Just use the IR markings... or remember your hyperfocal technique and stop down a bit if necessary... or use an apo lens. I find no refocus with the apo process lenses e.g. the process nikkors nor the apo Mamiya lenses in 645 and 6x7 format (I use the 200 apo and 300 apo for 645 and the 210 KL apo for the rb67 in 6x7/6x8).
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #4
    RobertV's Avatar
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    I use Heliopan RG715nm filters (88A) and compensate for 5 F stops.

    You can't get any 'wood' effect with this film with a standard red (25) or dark red (29) filter. Hence my #88A. A Hoya 72R is also possible.
    I give the focus a small correction to the IR marker.

    Developer: Use a semi-compensating developer because the precise IR exposure is not possible. I use AM74/RHS but there is no reason for a successfull HC-110 development.

    Yashica Mat 124-G + Heliopan Bay I RG715nm filter. 1/30S f=4,0 A TLR is a nice camera when doing IR photography because the filter is opague.
    The advantage of the Rollei IR820/400 is that you can shoot handheld although a tripod is often necessary to use.


  5. #5

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    Holland in wintertime........ Looks good !

    Peter

  6. #6
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertV View Post
    You can't get any 'wood' effect with this film
    Another IR newb question. What is 'wood' affect?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  7. #7
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Another IR newb question. What is 'wood' affect?
    The reaction of the IR light on the follikel and chlorofyl of the (green) trees and plants.
    Above example looks a bit on snow but it's the 'wood' effect of the green plants on the IR light which is only monitored by the IR film.

    The filter is completly blocking the visual light so the IR light is only on the film emulsion.
    Because the breaking index of IR light is slightly different then visual light you have to correct for the focus.

    Here some more IR examples:
    http://gallery.fotohuisrovo.nl/thumbnails.php?album=10
    and on 35mm:
    http://gallery.fotohuisrovo.nl/thumbnails.php?album=2

    Some info:
    http://www.fotohuisrovo.nl/documenta...P_Infrarot.pdf

    and an interesting web site about IR photography:
    http://www.vividlight.com/Articles/2915.htm

    Best regards,

    Robert

  8. #8
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Robert,

    Thank you for the explanation and the links. I found the one particularly interesting about the often overlooked little light (IR) leaks such as the date imprinting window, etc.

    I definitely have to give IR a try.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  9. #9
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Leaks in the window you will only have with high sensitive IR film like Kodak HIE (>900nm). But this film is discontinued.
    If you look at the actual films Efke IR820, Rollei IR820/400 and Rollei Super Pan 200, Ilford SFX you can load and unload in subdue light. Without a filter it's an expensive panchromatic film.

    All actual films except the Rollei IR820/400 you need a tripod because you're working in the range iso 1,5 - 6.
    Best cameras are TLR, Range Finder because you have clear vision by the view finder while a SLR is very difficult to focus (if not impossible) with an opague IR filter.
    I am working with above Yashica Mat 124-G TLR and a Leica M7 which are both very easy for infra red photography.

    The rest is very simple: just a small correction for the focus and choose a subject with trees and green plants. Also the development of above films is rather standard. Nothing special just because you never know the amount of IR light in the atmosphere use a semi-compensating developer. To check your development: Always make a picture without filter so that you're able to check the E.I. and your developing.

    With above instructions and common sense everybody is able to shoot on IR film with success.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by archphoto View Post
    Holland in wintertime........ Looks good !
    Doesn't look like wintertime.
    And i bet it's not Holland either.




    If we would write Wood effect, and not 'wood' effect, it would avoid the suggestion that the effect's relation with foliage is why it is called that.

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