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  1. #1
    bmac's Avatar
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    I'm really itching to try some negs in pyro, but don't want powdered chemicals for several reasons including small children in my house, and being an asthmatic myself. It's just too much of a headache. I have been using Hc110, Formula 76 (generic D76 in liquid concentrate) and Rodinal up until now.

    The only kit I have found is through Photographers Formulary http://www.photoformulary.com/Deskto...ion=0&langId=0

    The problem is that I do my negs in a Unicolor drum, so the PMK isn't a good choice, right?

    Do I have any other options? I'm really intrerested in trying Pyrocat after reading Sandy's article and posts on this board.
    hi!

  2. #2
    roy
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    [quote="bmac"]I'm really itching to try some negs in pyro, but don't want powdered chemicals

    Yes, there are some suppliers out there who do the lot in liquid form. Some while ago I purchased from Linhof & Studio in UK a version of PMK in two bottles. They did not make it up themselves and I know are agents for Lotus and also Bergger. If you want I can try and find out details of their supplier but it will be in Europe. What about Bostick & Sullivan ?
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  3. #3

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    Brian,

    Twice now I have purchased the liquid form kit for Pyrocat HD from Lotus View Camera (in Austria). The packaging is excellent - helps keep it all very fresh (the two solutions are in really quite attractive plastic bottles that have a lid that tightens up nicely). I processed over 100 8x10 sheets with this kit and have had no problems whatsoever. The convenience for me is worth the extra cost.
    Francesco

  4. #4

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    You might want to try Rollo Pyro from Bostick and Sullivan. it comes in liquid. I got decent results from it in a JOBO, but occasional streaking caused me to switch to Pyrocat HD which seems to be the best in a rotary processor.

  5. #5
    ann
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    try ArtCraft chemicals.

  6. #6
    bmac's Avatar
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    Thanks kids, I just got off the phone with B&S, ordered the liquid Pyro kit and Book of Pyro. The guy who took my order mentioned that HP5 might not be the best film to use due to fog. Anyone have problems with HP5 + pyro, and if so, what film would you suggest? I'll be using it in the 8x10 size.

    Thanks!
    hi!

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There are people using HP5+ and pyro. I really like Tri-x in pyro. I usually use PMK for 4x5" and smaller (negs to be enlarged) and ABC for 8x10" and larger (negs to be contact printed).

    You might do best with Rollo Pyro or ABC+ for drum processing, since the drum agitation will oxidize the developer faster and there is going to be less solution per sheet that way, so you could run into capacity problems. If you want to use PMK in a drum and you find you are not getting enough density, one approach I've heard of is to use two developer baths, so one bath for half the total recommended development time, dump, and a second bath for the second half of the time.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmac
    I'm really itching to try some negs in pyro, but don't want powdered chemicals for several reasons including small children in my house, and being an asthmatic myself. It's just too much of a headache. I have been using Hc110, Formula 76 (generic D76 in liquid concentrate) and Rodinal up until now.

    The only kit I have found is through Photographers Formulary http://www.photoformulary.com/Deskto...ion=0&langId=0

    The problem is that I do my negs in a Unicolor drum, so the PMK isn't a good choice, right?

    Do I have any other options? I'm really intrerested in trying Pyrocat after reading Sandy's article and posts on this board.
    There have been conflicting reports on the use of PMK in a drum. Initially it was reported as being not recommended. The most recent information that I have is that it can be used...so who knows? It does carry the consideration of stain color as it affects variable contrast paper.

    Insofar as a liquid version of Pyrocat, I don't know of anyone packaging it in that way. It would be a simple matter to take the dry chems and mix them upon arrival...that way you wouldn't have the dry chems around the house. The individual stock solutions have a sustained shelf life so that shouldn't be a problem.

    I have used ABC in the past, although not in a drum. I have found that ABC has objectionable grain when one enlarges the negative. It enables excellent film resolution and works very well for contact printing. However it does have a rep of not providing even development.

    Having tried all three of the mentioned developers the one that I have found to enable use as both a contact printing developer and an enlarging developer is Pyrocat. It can be used in a drum. The grain sure is a lot better then ABC when enlarging. It does not affect variable contrast materials in the same way that PMK can.

  9. #9

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    [quote="bmac"]I'm really itching to try some negs in pyro.

    I encourage you to exercise your curiosity, as I did. After 9 years of ABC & PMK I have hundreds of olive green negatives. Then one day I exclaimed, "This is too much work!" I went back to HC110 and TXP. Now I have hundreds of non-olive green negatives as well. When I print them I cannot, and I would defy you to, tell which are which. In retrospect, it WAS too much work. But, knock yourself out and make your own decision.

  10. #10
    roy
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    [quote="Deckled Edge"]
    When I print them I cannot tell which are which. In retrospect, it WAS too much work.

    I ask this in a sense of inquisitiveness, what made you carry on for all those years, did you not discern a difference in the first place ? I have often wondered whether sometimes we get carried along on a wave of trying to do something different or because others have tried it. I am not saying that all developers are the same, clearly they are not but if the benefits are not that great for the individual and finished results are not a 'revelation', as you say, why carry on. It all boils down to personal preference and whether the results are what suits your style of image making.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

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