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  1. #11

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    Yes, and now I can see that is very true. I guess the 'bleach bypass' adds density because the silver is in there too.

    Any ideas on improving the density of the B&W negative? Over/under exposure? Over/under develop time? Redevelopment? Other?

    Thanks!

  2. #12
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    Fix only might help, or severe overexposure. If the print is light, the negative will be dark.

    PE

  3. #13

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    The process I looked through on Flickr mentions fix before the bleach http://www.flickr.com/photos/pacorocha/3575641036/

    I gave it a go and was too keen with the amount of bleach I used and got some on the side I didn't want an as such washed away some of the negative. http://www.flickr.com/photos/frontdr...7606780091301/

    As I'm not a full darkroom user (zero enlarging/printing skills) the best I could do with the negative is scan and print.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    Any ideas on improving the density of the B&W negative? Over/under exposure? Over/under develop time? Redevelopment? Other?

    Thanks!
    Just quick ideas: try developing longer than usual (probably won't help), and you might also warm the positive/negative package a bit while developing, I am thinking a warm, moist towel.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Just quick ideas: try developing longer than usual (probably won't help), and you might also warm the positive/negative package a bit while developing, I am thinking a warm, moist towel.
    Backwards!

    The colder or shorter transfer will leave more dye behind in the negative.

    PE

  6. #16
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    Ah yes, you're right, you want minimal dye transfer.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  7. #17

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    I am very pleased with the results I get in color. All my dyes are happy.

    I am specifically interested in a way to improve the density of my B&W negative...from Fuji FP-100B film. I am looking for a Polaroid 665 replacement.

    It appears that the silver negative in the color film is fairly dense (and the negative itself is more durable). Is there a way of removing the dyes but leaving the silver image? Kind of a reverse bleach? Maybe that would work? Then I would get a B&W negative to work with.

  8. #18

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    I've tried the FP-3000B b/w materials and used the peel away part as a negative that I've scanned and inverted and then used for a print with varied results. I've experimented with the FP-100C in making image transfers that give inconsistent but interesting results. Using the backing to get a negative type materials could provide an art type look.

  9. #19

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    I really want to be able to make on-the-spot cyanotypes in a demonstration setting. I need a negative with the required density to do it.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    I really want to be able to make on-the-spot cyanotypes in a demonstration setting. I need a negative with the required density to do it.
    How are you intending on drying these rapidly? I was hanging around with a fuji FP3000B user last week and he said the goop side takes 1-2 hours to dry. I don't see how you can do a whole class rapidly in only an hour AND make cyanotypes.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

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