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  1. #1

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    getting a usable negative from instant peel apart film

    Recently on the Flickr Polaroid forum it has been discovered that the black backing on Fuji peel-apart films can be removed by applying household bleach. The result is a film negative.

    Eagerly looking for a Polaroid 665 replacement, I gave it a try.

    The FP-100C color film works really well. The negative is sturdy. The film has a purplish mask. Using hybrid techniques, I was able to recover the image with very surprising quality. Being able to recover a color negative is very exciting and new!

    The FP-3000B film has a reflective backing so things don't work there. Reflective scanning using hybrid technique does work.

    The FP-100B film reveals a clear film base and a negative image. There are two problems that I am hoping the geniuses on APUG can help me with.

    First, the negative is very thin. The density on the negative is minimal. Does anyone have any ideas on how to improve this (timing before peeling, temperature, chemical treatment, intensifiers, etc)?

    Second, there appears to be solarization in parts of the negative. Some places on the negative have a much more dense reddish hue. I'm not sure how to get rid of this where it is undesireable. Also, I am hoping this can be tamed and used to increase density.

    Ideas are appreciated. Or, maybe you have a better idea? I am looking to take a photo, get a negative immediately, and make a cyanotype as part of a 1 hour science demonstration. Thanks!

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I lift the fp100c emulsions without bleach... just boiling water.

    Anyway, to improve density, why not just adjust exposure. Recall that with type 55, it was quite common to expose differently for the neg than for the positive.

    Not sure about the solarization, I haven't seen it. Is it an effect of the bleach? Maybe you could try throwing the neg in some fix.

    If you have an hour, how about just doing an in-camera cyanotype.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #3

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    @keith, I am not lifting the emulsion off the print...just removing the black backing from the negative so I have a usable negative image for enlarging/scanning/contact printing. The bleach never touches the negative emulsion -- I tape it face down to glass to protect it while I'm rubbing off the backing. I did adjust exposure...2 stops overexposure gives a very light print but the negative is still very thin.

    In camera cyanotype is cool but I am looking to take 10-20 portraits and have each person develop their own along a production line.

    Thoughts and comments appreciated.

  4. #4
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    The image will be thin due to the fact that it has about 1/3 of the dyestuffs needed for a film negative. It is intended for a reflective support, so you are kinda stuck there.

    Also, silver halide and silver metal will be present in this image and will probably gradually obscure it unless bleached and fixed.

    PE

  5. #5
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    @keith, I am not lifting the emulsion off the print...just removing the black backing from the negative so I have a usable negative image for enlarging/scanning/contact printing.
    Oh okay, but what I call an emulsion lift is really easy for the fp100c. You just throw the whole thing in boiling water, the emulsion comes off, you dry it, and then you can treat that as a (slightly thin) slide. I've put the fp100c emulsion in an enlarger and gotten good results.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  6. #6

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    @photo-engineer, There is dye in the B&W film? Is that what is creating the reddish solarization?

    I am speaking specifically about the B&W material -- FP-100B which is equivalent (sort-of) to old Polaroid 664 film (B&W ISO 100). Why is it that a Polaroid 665 negative can be so dense but the FP-100B negative is so thin.

    Thanks for your tips and knowledge.

    @keith, that is a cool trick. That might work for my demo. I will experiment there. But isn't the resulting print a negative since your negative is really a positive? Thanks!

  7. #7
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Would a selenium bath increase the density of the images on this type of film?

  8. #8
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    There should be no dye in the B&W film, but there will be retained silver and silver halide. OTOH, they may incorporate a small quantity of acutance dye and AH dye to sharpen the image. This might be a possibility.

    PE

  9. #9

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    PE, I tried your suggestion of bleaching and fixing the color negative. It definitely had an effect. I'm not sure it was a good one though. ;-) The film base was cleared dramatically of the purple color that casts the negative. However, the removal of the silver seems to have made things a bit thin. I will have to try some shots that are more overexposed in an attempt to keep the dye on the negative side.

    I am also going to try dropping the B&W negative in some HC-110 to see what happens. If all the developed silver moved to the print, then I would want to develop the remaining halide right? That is a half-thought through concept. So, let me know if I am way off. I'll post what happens.

  10. #10
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    I mentioned the reason for the thinness in a previous post here. Reflection print materials use about 1/2 to 1/3 the dyestuffs that transmission materials do. This is because the white reflective back just about doubles the dye density achieved by a given amount of dye.

    PE

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