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  1. #11

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    How to get to grade 2

    Fred Picker in his Zone VI work shop book goes through test to find your equipmets proper setting : meter and camera if meter is seperate,and then film processing so that you print on Grade 2 to avoid the problems your having. Basically the test are to take exposures of a blank flat surface with the film you like to use starting with the meter's recomended exposure then
    -1, -2, -3, + 1,+2, +3 stops. 1 stop = 1 shutter speed if your camera is working corretly. Record which frame is what! After the film manfacturers recomended development have a lab do a densiometer test and see which exposure is really zone VI or what the manufacture has posted on their web site, The densiometer reading will be RGB you want the R (red) number.
    To test your camera's shutter speeds see Rick Olsen's shutter spped test using your computer monitor then simply Shoot the same sceen at diffrent shutter speeds F stop combonations keeping the metered exposure the same I.E. 1/500 F5.6 = 1/250 F8 ( lower shutter speed higher F number and vise versa) a few cameras like the old Retina IIc locks the rings together so shutter speed and F stops change together if all is working right the negative will all have the same density(density roughly equals over all brightness).
    If you need a chart of densities I'll post a link to one I found for most films.
    Jay

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Under exposure accentuates the grain. Many of us down-rate 400ISO films to get better tonality & shadow details. Try shooting at 200 EI and cut the dev time by 15%

    You can do practical tests to determine the correct film speed & dev times, there's plenty of articles about it in the internet.

    You may also have under-exposed because of the filter, it's best to meter with-out and then adjust using the factor on the filter.

    Ian
    Good advise. Filters don't belong in front of a lightmeter.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas View Post
    From the looks of the racecar shot you are underexposed. No detail in the dark areas. The beach scene looks a bit under too but the bright highlights prevent printing any lighter. At a guess you seem to be underexposing and overdeveloping a bit.
    Hoffy

    Take the above comment and Ian's advise seriously. Expose your film at half the box speed and underdevelop by 15%. If this is too slow for your type of photography get a faster film. It will do wonders to your photography!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    GJA
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    IMHO, pulling film (over expose, under develop) is generally not as successful as using a slower speed. I would rather shoot an ISO50 film than pull an ISO100 film one stop. It certainly depends on what films you like and what kind of developers you use as well.

  5. #15
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    In this case it is not pulling the film but finding a correction for the entire metering and exposure system being used in the photograph to get the true EI to use for best results.
    Gary Beasley

  6. #16
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    OK, thanks for the replies. Certainly a few things to try (As you can guess, I am still learning).

    Just in relation to the Under exposing. I bracketed the Beach scene above and developed one of the other shots, that was slightly longer exposed (No idea what. These were taken while on a beach walk with the wife, so noting that specifics was low on the mind!) and the grain is much better. I just didn't get the same dramatic look in the clouds as the shot above (It was a very dark background, with sun highlights down lower)

    The car, well, thats the fun of sports photography. I was trying not to blow the highlights in certain area's (white concrete on the otherside of the track), but then you have to deal with black cars. A balancing act I know!.

    Cheers

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    OK, thanks for the replies. Certainly a few things to try (As you can guess, I am still learning).

    Just in relation to the Under exposing. I bracketed the Beach scene above and developed one of the other shots, that was slightly longer exposed (No idea what. These were taken while on a beach walk with the wife, so noting that specifics was low on the mind!) and the grain is much better. I just didn't get the same dramatic look in the clouds as the shot above (It was a very dark background, with sun highlights down lower)

    The car, well, thats the fun of sports photography. I was trying not to blow the highlights in certain area's (white concrete on the otherside of the track), but then you have to deal with black cars. A balancing act I know!.

    Cheers
    Hoffy

    You will get the dramatic look into the sky by burning the sky in with a higher grade filter. I'm sure you get get even more drama.

    As far as the car picture is concerned, if you worried about blown-out highlights, follow the old advise:

    If in doubt, overexpose and underdevelop! This will get detail into the shadows and keep the highlight from getting too dense on the negative.

    It is really hard to overexpose and not being able to recover the highlights. I have made successful prints from negatives, which got 6 stops too much light (actually people asked me what my secret for shadow detail was). But, even half a stop underexposure and the negative is lost. You can salvage it, but it will never make a perfect print.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas View Post
    In this case it is not pulling the film but finding a correction for the entire metering and exposure system being used in the photograph to get the true EI to use for best results.
    Exactly right!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19

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    Contrast doesn't really have to have anything to do with grain.

    You can have a high contrast image with little grain by shooting on 8x10 sheet film for example.
    Last edited by WolfTales; 07-09-2009 at 10:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I brake for fixer!

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