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  1. #1
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Does increased contrast mean increased grain?

    Howdy,

    I have been developing some piccies tonight and trying a few things.

    For one shot, I have done two test strips, on at about grade 4 and the other at about grade 5 (I say about, I am going by the settings on the colour head, as opposed to using filters).

    I have noticed that the one that was on the higher contrast is substantially more grainy. Is that normal?

    BTW, this is HP5+, developed in LC29 and shot through a Red Filter. The paper is Ilford Multigrade RC and the paper developer is Ilford Multi Purpose.

    Cheers

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
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    The grain is always there but the higher contrast print paper accentuates the grain and makes it more visible. No way around that.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3
    hoffy's Avatar
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    OK, makes sense

  4. #4

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    If using grades 4 and 5 was simply to see the effect then ignore the rest of this reply but if the prints needed either of these grades to look right then you might want to examine your film developing process. With a colour head the print contrast should come out at about grade 3 for normal negs. Unless high contrast was the aim in the print as an effect then normal negs at these grades will print as black and white literally with few shades of greys and should look overly "stark" and lack detail.

    pentaxuser

  5. #5
    hoffy's Avatar
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    OK, and this is where its going to get fun for me. I am not 100% sure whether it really is the grades. I am just going by the settings and the fact sheet from ilford.

    Now, sorry about the bad scan (& all the marks....this turned out to be a rather dirty neg). This was done at what I can gather is Grade 3 and was shot with a red filter:

    To my eye, it was relatively accurate and very grainy

    Again, another scratched neg (I must learn to look after them a bit better), but this was done at what should have been grade 5 (this was shot with no filter)


    What do I need to alter to change the contrast when developing the film?

  6. #6
    glbeas's Avatar
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    From the looks of the racecar shot you are underexposed. No detail in the dark areas. The beach scene looks a bit under too but the bright highlights prevent printing any lighter. At a guess you seem to be underexposing and overdeveloping a bit.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #7
    GJA
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    Yes, this is normal. Grain is simply difference in tone, and increasing the contrast is to increase difference in tone. For this reason, I try to increase contrast in ways that do not affect the grain of the film, like filters.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Under exposure accentuates the grain. Many of us down-rate 400ISO films to get better tonality & shadow details. Try shooting at 200 EI and cut the dev time by 15%

    You can do practical tests to determine the correct film speed & dev times, there's plenty of articles about it in the internet.

    You may also have under-exposed because of the filter, it's best to meter with-out and then adjust using the factor on the filter.

    Ian

  9. #9
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

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    Last edited by Christopher Walrath; 06-27-2009 at 01:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  10. #10
    vdoak's Avatar
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    Generally , yes, (ditto to "glbeas")

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