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  1. #1
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Dektol....same as D72?

    I usually buy Dektol when I can, but this is not always convenient, so I mix up D72 instead. I guess the question is....are they the same? Not that it matters too much, just curious.

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Yes, the same. Kodak publications with D72 say that it's available a s a packaged developer, without giving the name.

    There's two published versions, virtually identical, the most commonly published has the weights rounded to the nearest gram

    Ian

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    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    It is my understanding that the stuff one finds in a Dektol package is different somewhat from D-72; but that this difference is in the sequestering agents bonded to the varius constituents so that they all dissolve in the proper order. In addition, I believe there might be some kind of water conditioners incorporated as well.
    For myself, I have always considered Dektol and D72 direct equivalents; just that Dektol is more convenient to mix up, that's all.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #4

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    How about Zone vi developer? Is such also a variant of Dektol John?

    Ed

  5. #5
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    Dektol = D72 + a sequestering agent (at one time Calgon, then Quadrofos and now.... Dequest? IDK)

    The sequestering agent has nothing to do with the order of dissolution of ingredients, nor is it bonded to anything. It is just another part of the mix.

    The developing agents and the alkali are encapsulated in two different capsules of bonding agents which separate and protect the developing agents from the alkali. When they hit water, the "capsules" all dissolve and form a uniform mixture. The mix is packed under an inert gas.

    Neither the sequestering agent, nor the encapsulating material affect development properties unless you mix D72 using very hard water. In that case, you may get some sludge or a fine precipitate.

    If the formula for Zone VI = D72 then they are equal.

    PE

  6. #6
    tbm
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    I have never used Dektol for paper development. What appearance does it give a darkroom print--cold or neutral blacks?

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Kodak say Neutral to Cold.

    There is also liquid Dektol, which is the same as Polymax T developer, this has been re-formulated in recent years to use Potassium Sulphite, Potassium Carbonate & Potassium Hydroxide in place of Sodium Sulphite and Sodium Carbonate, this a allows a more concentrated solution, and cuts costs. Ilford have done the same with their Liquid paper developers.

    Ian

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    If I remember correctly, Fred Picker advertised his Zone VI developer as having no sequestering agents. It is/was packaged in two separate packages that are mixed with water. What the exact ingredients and proportions are, I have no idea. Is it close to Dektol, I'd say yes. The differences are/were small. Noticeable, yes, but not night and day.

    Peter Gomena

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The truth is most companies made very similar developers, so there's Ilford & Agfa (inc Ansco.Gaf & Orwo/Calbe) developers that are equivalent to Dektol/D72.

    Many of Kodak's early developers came either from companies they took over, like Nepera (Velox), Wratten etc or were clones of European developers, many of which were in publications like the British Journal of Photography. Much early work on developers was done by companies like Lumiere & Hauff.

    Ian

  10. #10
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    I would have to add that virtually every formula that Kodak used or produced but did not originate was published in some manner by Kodak at one time or another. Formulas that originated through internal R&D were never published.

    And so we can find Dektol = D72 as an open formula, but Microdol X is not.

    PE

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