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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Hmm, lots of stuff here, so lets pick out some pieces to deal with.



    Plastic reels are usually adjustable, but they may then take up more space, if there is ever a chance that you could do multiple rolls one after another, then make sure you have twice the number of reels as space in your tank. For example if your tank can accommodate 2 reels at a time, then you want a minimum of 4 reels. Plastic reels must be completely dry before using them or the film will stick to the reel. So having an extra set means not having to sit there with a hair dryer trying to get the reel dry.
    A former photography instructor of mine used to work at a newspaper. To get his film to dry quicker, he cut a cylindrical tube of pve pipe big enough for I think four steel reels to fit in. He built a lid that would hold the nozzle of a hair dryer. Somehow, the bottom reel was raised off the bottom a little so that it wasnt standing in a pool of water. I cant remember how he did that, though.

    You might can build a similar contraption to dry plastic reels if that's the way you want to go. You could probably dry the film on the plastic reels, too.


    As a side note on this subject, he took the film out of the reel and reloaded it backwards. According to him, it helped the film dry flat. I've never had a problem with film drying flat, though. That's a good thing because there's no way I'd be able to wind the wet film backwards on the wet plastic reels.








    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post

    For a first attempt use a normal developer like D76 or ID11 (they are really the same), other then that you need fixer, any will do. I suggest though the first time you mix the chemicals, do a clip test to make sure they are working and you have not goofed anything up, some guys doing it for years still do this.
    I'd suggest using one developer until you get used to how it works. I'd offer the same advice with film. Use one or two kinds of film until you know how they'll look in a given situation.

    My problem in my early days was wanting to try every black and white film I could find. All I ended up with was prints of underexposed negatives

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by WGibsonPhotography View Post
    A former photography instructor of mine used to work at a newspaper. To get his film to dry quicker, he cut a cylindrical tube of pve pipe big enough for I think four steel reels to fit in. He built a lid that would hold the nozzle of a hair dryer. Somehow, the bottom reel was raised off the bottom a little so that it wasnt standing in a pool of water.
    Yeah, that would be quick, but inconsistent with producing high quality negatives. Too much risk of blowing dust onto wet emulsion where it will stick and be impossible to remove once dry. What's the rush?
    Frank Schifano

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Yeah, that would be quick, but inconsistent with producing high quality negatives. Too much risk of blowing dust onto wet emulsion where it will stick and be impossible to remove once dry. What's the rush?


    It apparently worked for him. I'm assuming he had a pretty dust free darkroom. I just run hot water in the shower for a few minutes then hang the negatives up on the shower curtain rod. That works good enough for me.

  4. #24
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    [ suggest using one developer until you get used to how it works. I'd offer the same advice with film. Use one or two kinds of film until you know how they'll look in a given situation.

    *********
    Amen, brother!!
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  5. #25

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    is it best, or easiest, to stay within the same brand? after some of the suggested reading, i'm thinking about using ilford fp4 and dd-x as my starting combo. any thoughts? will this be a good starting point?
    Last edited by BimmerJake; 07-08-2009 at 07:13 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typographic error :)
    -Jake

    Photography by the seat of my pants.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Yeah, that would be quick, but inconsistent with producing high quality negatives. Too much risk of blowing dust onto wet emulsion where it will stick and be impossible to remove once dry. What's the rush?
    I don't know about him, but in a few days all the french are going to celebrate my 82nd birthday. For some reason, they call it "Bastille Day". I figure I don't have time to waste on that stuff. Of course, I have some to waste here.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by BimmerJake View Post
    is it best, or easiest, to stay within the same brand? after some of the suggested reading, i'm thinking about using ilford fp4 and dd-x as my starting combo. any thoughts? will this be a good starting point?
    Mixing developer & film brands is fine. I develop my Kodak Tri-X in DD-X and it works great.

    FP4+ and DD-X should be fine. DD-X produces very good film speed. You should be able to expose your film at EI 125 (i.e. the ISO box speed) even when the light is contrasty and got lots of detail in the shadows.

    Another alternative - if you find yourself ordering from FreeStyle - is to order Clayton F76+ developer, instead of DD-X. It's less expensive on a per-roll basis and produces results that are just about exactly the same.

    The only downside is that while an open bottle of DD-X can last for several years without going bad, the same is not true of F76+. But if you plan to develop many rolls soon after purchasing the developer, then F76+ is a good value.

    But the important thing is just to get some experience under your belt using the same film & developer combination. There are no bad choices and FP4+ and DD-X should be perfectly fine.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by WGibsonPhotography View Post
    It apparently worked for him. I'm assuming he had a pretty dust free darkroom. I just run hot water in the shower for a few minutes then hang the negatives up on the shower curtain rod. That works good enough for me.
    Ditto. I don't use the forced-air drying method but the "run the shower" method sure does cut down on airborne dust.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  9. #29

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    I use a Jobo-Tank with the plastik reels for about 10 years and have found them to work flawless. Adjustable for 35mm and 120 film, IMO easier to clean than SS-tanks. The reels have to be bone dry to get film on.

    My recommondation for film developer is Rodinal, cheap, lasts forever, and is one-shot, no stock solutions, no powder, just get a couple of ml per film out, dilute with water and you are ready to go. There is some grain, the sharpness is excellent.

  10. #30

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    just ordered film, developer, and fixer. i also have the hardware coming my way. soon i'll have my own home developed film
    -Jake

    Photography by the seat of my pants.

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