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  1. #21
    bmac's Avatar
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    I use plastic clothspins hanging in a closet sweater container thing. A plastic enclosed compartment I bought at the hardware strore.
    hi!

  2. #22

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    I was never able to make the daylight tanks work. They also require that all sheets be developed for the dsame length of time.

    I prefer tray processing. I can process 6 sheets at once for six differnet developing times. The instructions are in a free article on the View Camera magaizne web site

    www.viewcamera.com

    go to the Free Articles section.

    steve simmons

  3. #23
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I also like tray processing for the reasons Steve Simmons mentions, and do it regularly for 8x10" and 11x14" and occasionally for 4x5", so even if you have a daylight tank, it's worth learning how to tray process. I usually have enough 4x5" sheets that are going in for the same development time, though, to justify using the tank.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  4. #24

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    I have these great Miniture spring clamps You can get at home depot. They have rubber tips and take up very little area on the film..
    You guys that tray develop must have gentle hands, My film always ended up damaged some how. I'm a tank developer. "Dip and dunk you know it's the only way to go"
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  5. #25
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    I'm a rank amateur and a beginner at 4x5, without a darkroom to boot... so FWIW. I started using my Patterson without the reels: not recommended unless scratched negs is what you're after. I bought the Jobo 2500 tank, and use it manually. It holds up to 6 sheets and after some practice, isn't all that difficult to load in a changing bag. It does not leak and drains very quickly. The only drawback is that to fill it requires 1500ml, whereas used on a processor, it would require only 270ml.

    So on that front, and having never seen how processors agitate, I wonder if I could use reduced amounts of solution, and "simulate" the movement/times a processor uses. What is it, constant rotation with the tank on its side?

  6. #26

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    If you don't want to do tray development of sheet film you might consider using the Polaroid Type 55P/N film. You can process in the field or remove the film from the Polaroid holder and bring it home and process it later. The negative has long been rumored to be Pan-X from Kodak. It is very fine grained and long scale.

    steve simmons

  7. #27
    Sean's Avatar
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    *thread moderated -admin

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve simmons
    If you don't want to do tray development of sheet film you might consider using the Polaroid Type 55P/N film.
    steve simmons
    Developing sheet films in trays is a time-proven method that works well for some people. In fact, some of the best photographers I know develop film this way and my hat is off to them for their ability.

    But for many others this method is a certain recipe for disaster. I tried it for years and the end result was a fairly high percentage of scratched negatives. And of course having to wear gloves, as any prudent person should do when developing film, made it even worse. And I really dislike having to stand around in the dark shuffling film for long periods of time.


    Eventually I switched to rotary processing in tubes of the BTZS type with 5X7 film and in print drums for ULF film. The change for me resulted in a vast improvement in the quality of my negatives because I now never see the scratches that plagued my efforts at sheet processing. And I can do most of the developing with the lights on.

    One option for those who like to develop in trays but are concerned about scratches is to put the film in open ended PVC tubes and roll them around in a tray filled with developer. I recall that someone did an article on this type of tray developing some years ago in one of the national magazines but I can not place the reference at this time. You need 1.5" tubes for 4X5 film, 2" for 5X7 and 3" for 8X10. It would be very inexpensive to give this method a try because all you have to do is cut a piece of PVC tubes, which is dirt cheap, into tubes of the right length. Assuming you already have the trays to roll them around in of course. And of course you have to stand around in the dark!!

    Sandy King

  9. #29

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    Sandy is correct, there was an article in the past couple of years I think..wish I could remember. It was that or online on the net I read the same thing. If memory serves me correctly, the author used the BTZ tubes, just took the caps off and rolled them in each tray. Can't remember if there was an impact on developing times or not.

    I agree Sandy, my hat is off to those that can tray process without damage - since I just started processing 4x5 have not done that much (25 or so sheets), tried a Beseler 8x10 rotary tank with so, so results (could not get a good seal) - Don's home made tubes looked like a possible choice, but this may ticket - cheaper than a slosh tray I was considering.

    Sandy, don't you think Don's screen would be an asset with this type of system?

    Thanks Sandy.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  10. #30

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    [quote="photomc"]Sandy, don't you think Don's screen would be an asset with this type of system?
    quote]


    Frankly I have never found such a screen to be necessary when developing in tubes. I just make sure that the back of the film is wet before starting develoment (just pull it in and out of the tube in water) and the anti-halation backing will be removed during fixing or washing.

    Just for the record, I remove the film from the tubes and development and fix and wash in trays. If one wanted to do everything with the film in the tubes then the screen might serve some purpose. But for the way I process film the screen just seems an unnecessary complication.

    Sandy

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