Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,291   Posts: 1,535,448   Online: 910
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 47
  1. #31
    DrPhil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    169
    Niko,

    The Jobo system is a good system. I know of a few people that simulate the agitation of a Jobo processor with a print drum roller base. You can usually get a used one at a good photo shop. A Jobo uses very similar agitation.
    Facts are facts; however, perception is reality.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    When I was looking for a 4x5 daylight tank, I was in the same predicament as you were. I looked at the Yankee tank and decided that it would be a real PITA, so settled on the HP Combi-Plan tank. I've not been disappointed. you can load it in a changing bag if you must and it does take a bit of practice before you get it right. Occassionally, you'll get two sheets of film stuck together with the predictable uneven development results if you don't load it right. You can use the valves for drain and fill as well. True, these operations do take longer than they would in a roll film tank so it would behoove you to use slower acting developers with this tank. This will insure that you don't get uneven development.

  3. #33
    gma
    gma is offline
    gma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    793
    Images
    9
    Has anyone discovered a way to use the Yankee daylight tank successfully? I had the same problem with uneven development in the open skies. I thought it was my faulty technique. It seems that if we use diluted developer and lower temperatures to maximize the developing time we could agitate more and possibly eliminate the problem.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    I have used the Yankee tank without a problem (SO FAR). My standard developer is D76 diluted 1 to 1. However, I have to say I much prefer using my Unicolor drums and motor base.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Everyone I know who has tried it says the Yankee tank is a disaster. Don't do it.

    The HP Combi-Plan tank has its admirers, and Jobo is another option in current production. I use an older Nikor stainless steel tank, which is no longer made. Each one of these options seems to work for some people and not for others and has some inherent advantages and disadvantages. Any of them can be loaded in a changing bag or tent of sufficient size.

    I would appreciate clarification as to which 4X5 develoing tanks (not Jobo) are currently available new. My understanding is that the only one is the HP Combi-Plan Tank, and that the Yankee and Nikor stainless steel tanks mentioned are only available used. Is this correct?


    Sandy King

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    368
    I am befuddled by the want to use these tanks. They require the user to develop all the sheets for the same length of time.

    I still think tray development is the way to go. I can develop six sheets simultaneously for six different times. 1 scratched negative in 26 years.

    steve simmons

  7. #37

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    I can think of a couple of reasons right off the top of my head. A lot of us are not quite so dextrous and would wind up scratching film. I won't even begin to contemplate developing different sheets for different times in the same batch. Keeping track of all that would hurt my brain too much. Temperature control is easier with a daylight tank. Many of us do not have a sink in the darkroom and use a laundry room or bathroom for developing film.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by steve simmons
    I am befuddled by the want to use these tanks. They require the user to develop all the sheets for the same length of time.

    I still think tray development is the way to go. I can develop six sheets simultaneously for six different times. 1 scratched negative in 26 years.

    steve simmons
    Seems like we have been down this road before!

    I am not personally interested in the tank system of development for sheet films but I am currently involved in a writing project that involves methods of development and believe that the best approach is to describe thoroughly the various systems of development, with their advantages and disadvantages, and let people make up their own mind as to what is most appropriate for their own requirements.

    Sandy King

  9. #39
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,085
    Images
    190
    being new to lf work, and knowing nothing in advance, i bought a doran tank which looked well designed on the shelf at B&H. i diligently practiced loading the thing with a sheet of film 'til i was reasonably adept at it and then loaded 10 sheets and with the lights on and a big smile on my face, began to develop the film.

    the directions called for 1600 ml of developer which entered the tank at an excruciatingly glacial pace. around 1450 ml into the pour, the developer began sloshing out of the tank on the sides. stupid me....i'd imagined the directions were accurate and hadn't tested the actual capacity. other than the mess i'd created though, things seemed to go fairly well. (however, i was none too pleased with the agitation style of sloshing the tank from side to side.)

    the results were a big disappointment. the edges of the film which were restrained by the slots were slightly less well developed than the rest of the negative. i also observed some mottling in areas which should have been even toned.

    the upshot is that i decided to be courageous and try open tray processing with some 5x7 trays from adorama. though i felt less than adept on the first try, the negatives emerged from their natal experience without a hitch thank you very much. thanks to some help from some folks on this site who advised me that there'd be no problem with the glow from a timer i couldn't have been more pleased with the outcome.

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by jovo
    being new to lf work, and knowing nothing in advance, i bought a doran tank which looked well designed on the shelf at B&H. i diligently practiced loading the thing with a sheet of film 'til i was reasonably adept at it and then loaded 10 sheets and with the lights on and a big smile on my face, began to develop the film.
    With the Doran do you load the film direrctly into the tank or is loaded onto film racks as with the HP Combi?

    Sandy King

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin