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  1. #41
    jovo's Avatar
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    sanking: the film is loaded directly into the tank via a slotted rectangular bar which one moves across the top of the tank using little nubs as locators over each slot. it's ingenious enough and works fairly well, but requires practice to avoid mistakes. i have since read that it makes sense to pour developer into the tank in the dark with the lid off to fill it more rapidly and avoid uneven development.

    i use the tank now as a film washer filling it first with water and then sliding the tray fixed film into the slots quite easily in daylight.

  2. #42

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    There is a detailed description of my tray development process in a free article on our web site

    www.viewcamera.com

    it is easier than you think.

    steve simmons

  3. #43

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    I have stopped developing 4x5 sheets film in Combiplan when I have discovered BTZS tubes. With the tank you need 1.2 liter of solution for 6 sheets, only 60cc per sheet for the tube. Development is also more consistent with the tube. I only use the tank for fixing and washing the negatives.

  4. #44
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve simmons
    I am befuddled by the want to use these tanks. They require the user to develop all the sheets for the same length of time.

    I still think tray development is the way to go. I can develop six sheets simultaneously for six different times. 1 scratched negative in 26 years.

    steve simmons
    The nikor I can do more than 6 sheets at a time of 4x5. And most times when I am out in the field I can take upward of 20 shots. This gives me a chance to develop all the ones that would be of a same development time. If it is 6 or 5 sheets, I can use my jobo. For the times I want to use 2 to 4 I use Gordon Hutchings ss basket. For one sheet I use a nice little 5x7 tray. I have my system and it works for me.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    .

    I have my system and it works for me.
    And there is the key. Most persons who have been developing negatives for any length of time have a system that works best for them. There are advantages and disadvantages to all systems of development so by experience we adopt those systems that work best for us. To do otherwise would be just plain stupid, if not masochistic.

    Photographers today are using many different systems: rotary processing in BTZS tubes and Jobo drums, shuffle agitation in trays, develop by inspection in trays, development in tanks such as the HP Combi-Plan, development in trays with the film in PVC tubes, the Sexton Slosher, and what am I missing?

    Discussions such as this, when they take place, are most useful when they carefully weigh the pros and cons of each system according to reasonable criteria such as: 1) ability to provide even development, 2) freedom from development artifacts such as scratches, etc. 3) ease of operation, 4) potential to do most of the operation in daylight, and 5) cost. Those are my criteria, from highest importance to lowest, with about double value assigned to #1.

    Sandy King

  6. #46
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I have and use the Yankee tank, so I can't comment on the others. My only comment is that it uses a LOT of chemistry, so I always try to have all 12 slots filled to make the most of it. I haven't noticed any poor quality issues though(yet).

    Jdef told me another option that I'm anxious to try though, and that is development by inspection. He uses a very small green light on a footswitch. He developes the negs in a tray, and when he reaches the development time he flips the light on and inspects the neg. If the highlights are there, then he's done. I'm going to try this method using a Kodah No. 13 filter that I just got for panolure printing. I like the idea, we'll see how it works. Did I get that right Jdef?

  7. #47
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    I have the Yankee (the secret- forget the side-to-side instructions- shake the shit out of it) and Nikor (works better, same secret) tanks, but I have just recently taken to tray processing, and have had good results. Steve S is right- give the trays a shot!
    By the way, I'm curious as to why folks seem to limit themselves to 6 or less in the tray, what type of problems are you watching out for?
    The reason I ask is that, well I guess I'm too dumb to know any better, from using the tanks I got into the habit of working in groups of 12 negs (6 film holders). So that's how many I have been doing in trays. Yep, 12 :twisted:
    I don't see any scratches by inspecting the negs...
    ...but then again I have not printed since I switched (working out an enlarger problem) - Maybe I am in for an unpleasant surprise when I get one of these tray-processed negs on the enlarger... :ermm:

    Matt

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