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  1. #1

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    Hi, I am going to buy a 4x5 daylight development tank. Should you have any recommendation? Yankee?

    Also, can i load filem in dark cloth(i ment it is not too large)?
    Best wishes,
    Marcel

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Everyone I know who has tried it says the Yankee tank is a disaster. Don't do it.

    The HP Combi-Plan tank has its admirers, and Jobo is another option in current production. I use an older Nikor stainless steel tank, which is no longer made. Each one of these options seems to work for some people and not for others and has some inherent advantages and disadvantages. Any of them can be loaded in a changing bag or tent of sufficient size.

  3. #3

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    Hi Marcel,
    I've used the HP Combi-plan tanks a fair amount. They're fairly easy to load in a changing bag once you get the hang of it. They're also good and tight. Each one holds 6 sheets of film, but I think it's best to start out doing four at a time until you get the hang of how the film goes into the holder.

    One thing I would recommend is putting the film into an already filled tank, rather than pouring the chemicals in after the film is loaded. Much less chance of streaking this way.

    I started out with two tanks. I'd take the loaded film holder (inside the changing bag) into a dark room and put it into a water-filled tank for pre-soak, then go dark again for the minute or two it took to switch the holder into the tank filled with developer. Then, by the time the film was ready for fixing, I'd shut out the lights again and switch the holder into the tank full of fixer.

    Never had any trouble with uneven development using this method, and I wasn't confined at all while doing it.

    Now that I have a darkroom, I still use them unless I'm stand processing, and for that I use an ancient (monster) Morse unit that's six or eight tanks in a water bath.

    Good Luck!
    Jeanne

    http://www.jeannewells.com

  4. #4
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I've never had a problem with the Combi-Plan or the Jobo tank. The Combi-Plan is nice in that the times an results are about the same as using roll film in a small hand tank. The Jobo tanks are nice because you can run both roll and sheet film at the same time.

    I also use the valves on the Combi-Plan with no problems which allows for true daylight development.

  5. #5
    DrPhil's Avatar
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    I'll second the responce about the Yankee tank. It sucks. However, if you do get one, Use a couple of rubber bands to hold the lid on. I lost several batches of film this way. The combi plan is nicer. However, neither of these is easy to fill and drain. I finally broke down and bought a Jobo with an expert drum. My negatives promptly began looking better. I believe that this is mostly due to my ability to now control the process with more precision. If you look around on eBay you can find nice Jobos for a few hundred bucks.

  6. #6
    noseoil's Avatar
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    I used a yankee tank for about a year with mixed results. If the scene has no clear sky areas, you won't really have problems. Once you examine a clear sky closely, there seems to be an inherent problem with uneven development which I was never able to solve. It shows up as a mottled look, where you know there was nothing but plain sky.

    This was with PMK developer, but I think it would have happened with any developer. I'm using tray development now and use one sheet at a time if it is an important negative.

  7. #7
    Seele's Avatar
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    The Jobo works beautifully with the 2509 sheet film rack in a processing machine such as the CPE2, uses very little solution, and ensures very even development, but I found that by using the the supplied retainer plate there is a chance for the short edges to be underdeveloped.

    If you do not like the idea of using a processing machine, you can also track down a "Color by Beseler" 8" X 10" paper drum. This particular one is different from the others as it has a removeable divider arrangement which allows four sheets of film/paper to be loaded, once done, you pour the solutions into the drum via a large spout, as soon as you start rolling it, the solution is dumped over the interior surface. For developing a few sheet of film I tend to use the Beseler rather than rolling out the Jobo.

    With the film support side pressed against the inside wall, the anti-halation backing tends not to come off. But a bath in hypo-clearing agent can take it off altogether.

  8. #8
    DrPhil's Avatar
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    If you're going to get a Jobo then look for a CPA2 or CPP2. These both allow you to use the Jobo expert drums. If you take a look at both drums you'll realize that the expert drums are much easier to load.

  9. #9

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    David,

    As I see Nikor tank with reasonable price available in ebay. Should you have any neg. experience with this tank?
    Best wishes,
    Marcel

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I like the Nikor 4x5" tank, but some people I know have been frustrated with it. I think the key is to be sure the reel is properly adjusted and straight and to be sure to use enough solution to avoid uneven development (around 1100-1200 ml). Be sure it has the metal band that goes around the reel (though some people use a rubber band if they are missing the band).

    I have successfully developed up to 12 sheets at a time in the Nikor tank.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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