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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    tossik,

    Have you done any research on your own? Questions like what developer to use with what film is one that is ENTIRELY subjective. It's down to what people like for the most part. Here's a secret for you. You can use any developer you want. Really. It depends on what YOU like.
    But do start with D76, because it's the standard by which all other developers are measured. And there is a TON of information on how to use it out there. Especially Kodak's recommended developing times is a fabulous place to start.

    The answers to your questions about stop bath and fixing are mentioned on the manufacturer's packages and will vary with the product you use.

    I don't mean to sound negative, but how about you look some of the answers up? Use google and type into the search field: " Site:www.kodak.com fixer "
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tossik View Post
    So totally a newb question, 1:1 is after I mix the bag with a gallon then I delute that again 1:1 when developing, right?

    and what about times for stop and fix?

    Thanks for all the replies! I really want to get back into film
    ******
    Yes. Mix up the gallon of D76. Call that your stock solution. Just before developing, figure out how much solution you need to cover your film. Let's say you need sixteen ounces of solution to cover your film: take 8 ounces of stock solution and 8 ounces of plain water to make up you working solution. Try to have your working solution 68 F. Use your working solution once and throw it away.

    Stop bath--thirty seconds to a minute shall do just fine; use constant agitation.

    Fixer: with fresh fixer, pour it in and agitate gently for about a minute. Then you can take the lid off if you desire. Fix for 3-5 minutes, depending; agitate in the fixer every thirty seconds or so.

    Read the link to film developing provided above. Good luck, have fun; and keep asking questions. We're here to help.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #13

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    anscojohn,

    thanks for that info, that was exacly the answer i was looking for.

  4. #14
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I shoot lots of TriX at an exposure index of 200-320 depending on the light, and develop in D76 1+1 at 20C for about 8-9 minutes, depending on the light.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15

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    Tri-X in D-76, exposure index 250, 8 minutes in D-76 1:1 at 68 degrees F. Agitate continuously first 30 seconds, then two inversions of the tank each 30 seconds thereafter.

    Tri-X in HC-110 dilution B: EI 250, 5 minutes at 68 degrees F. Agitate continuously first 30 seconds, two GENTLE inversions each 30 seconds thereafter.

    Peter Gomena

  6. #16
    Henry Alive's Avatar
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    Last September, I wrote the results I had with TX400 / HC110. Here you can read it:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/5...400-hc110.html
    I just want to add that I repeated these analysis two months ago, and I got the same results. This time; I also read the relative density in Zone VIII, and it was 1.25.
    Theoretically, if you work with a condenser enlarger, like my case, a good exposed and developed film should has the following relative densities: ZI: 0.08 - 0.11 / ZV: 0.60 - 0.70 / ZVIII: 1.15 - 1.25.
    I think TX400, EI200, HC110, 1:47 (E), 6 minutes, 20ºC is OK.

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