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  1. #11
    trexx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Heath View Post
    This all started when I downloaded:


    Arista EDU Ultra 400 D-76 1+1 400 10 min 20C
    Arista EDU Ultra 400 D-76 stock 400 7-8 min 20C

    (7-8 min listed for 35mm) Will/why would this make a difference, if I am developing 120.


    Physically...What would a one-to-one mixture be? Pretend you are mixing it for me, tell me how you would do it.
    please..
    So the difference in 35 and 120 are often due to differences in film base or formulation. The difference in roll and sheet also is due to differences in agitation tank vs tray. 35 and 130 are most often the same. sheet can be vastly different when done in tray but could be the same if using a tank.

    So you mix the stock and put in your gallon jug. Just before you develop you mix 250ml stock and 250 water for a 1-to-1 dilution in a 500ml tank. When done toss it.
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  2. #12

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    35mm developing times are often a little shorter than for 120 because 35mm tends to be enlarged greater; minimum development time reduces grain clumping slightly, and this is often important for 35mm because of the bigger enlargement. 120 users can usually stand a slightly denser negative over 35mm because of the lower enlargement ratio; Sheet film can be a little denser than 120 for the same reason.

    D-76 is said to "blow out" highlights when used straight; 1:1 dilution helps prevent this (per Film Developing Cookbook). Personally, I have not used D-76 a lot so I can't say from experience, but when I've used D-76 straight, I haven't generally liked the results (this was ages ago).

    Charlie

  3. #13
    Greg Heath's Avatar
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    Maybe it's a "Man" thing...that I just don't read the instructions.

    Quote Originally Posted by dances_w_clouds View Post
    Yes: you were all right I wasn't. I noticed my mistake after my morning coffee and cig. I was doing my measurements to Imperial gallons which is ALMOST 5 liters.

    I have been using D76 in the Stock mode. Being such a newbie, and lack of probably reading the instructions I mistakenly assumed that a "Stock" mixture was the same as a 1+1 mixture.

    I also had been using the "Stock" mixture and using it ONCE and then dumping it. I didn't realize that I could use it more than once in the "stock" form. I actually went and pulled up the instructions.

    If I Mix the D76 full strength (Stock) then I can make a 1+1 mixture.
    1 part stock to 1 part water for a "one time" developer, much like using the Ilford Chemicals normally, and then dump it.

    I had always wondered why in my neophyte mind there was a D-76 replenisher. DUH ! I guess it pays to read the directions, and to not assume. If I had heeded that info, I could have saved so much money.

    Live and learn...

    Greg

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Heath View Post
    I have been using Kodak D76 Whole Bag mixed with 1 gallon of water (4 liters or so)...Physically...What would a one-to-one mixture be? Pretend you are mixing it for me, tell me how you would do it.
    please..
    I have been following the instructions on the package (Kodak Professional D-76 Developer, CAT 146 4817, for making the stock sol'n. Method is mix contents of 415g bag with 3 litres 50-55 C water until dissolved then top up to 3.8 Litres total vol.(1 U.S. Gallon). This is the stock as I understand it. When making a 1:1 dilution mix equal parts of stock and water which for me, if I'm doing two reels of 120 in a stainless tank, is just about 360::360 ml to cover the two reels of film. I believe these are the methods, and measures, the manufacturer intends.
    Last edited by rternbach; 07-10-2009 at 02:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Get over it."

  5. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    When making a 1:1 dilution mix equal parts of stock and water which for me, if I'm doing two reels of 120 in a stainless tank, is just about 360::360 ml to cover the two reels of film. I believe these are the methods, and measures, the manufacturer intends.[/QUOTE]

    *******
    Yup.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    In the photo community there is mixed understanding regarding ratio (:) and +. Some would say that 1:1 would be undiluted, raw, neat, whatever -- stock solution. You would use one part stock D-76 and add nothing to maintain 1:1 (1 to 1). A 1:2 ratio would be using 1 part D-76 and adding an equal amount of water to reach 1:2.

    Others will insist 1:1 is equal amounts of stock and water; such as D-76 1:1 is one part D-76 and an equal part of water.

    The 1:1 as a ratio has become accepted to mean 1+1.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Osgood View Post
    In the photo community there is mixed understanding regarding ratio ( and +. Some would say that 1:1 would be undiluted, raw, neat, whatever -- stock solution. You would use one part stock D-76 and add nothing to maintain 1:1 (1 to 1). A 1:2 ratio would be using 1 part D-76 and adding an equal amount of water to reach 1:2.

    Others will insist 1:1 is equal amounts of stock and water; such as D-76 1:1 is one part D-76 and an equal part of water.

    The 1:1 as a ratio has become accepted to mean 1+1.
    Appears the photo community convention differs from basic lab shorthand as I remeber it. I learned that 1:1 meant equal parts of two different soln's. In any case, the OP's insistence on a description of the methods used is well-taken. When in doubt I revert back to a description of Measures, Materials, Methods, & Procedures to help avoid miscommunication, misunderstandings, and worst of all--the loss of hard-earned exposures. This basic approach has also helped prevent embarassing incompatibilities between spacecraft attempting to dock with each other.
    "Get over it."

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Osgood View Post

    Others will insist 1:1 is equal amounts of stock and water; such as D-76 1:1 is one part D-76 and an equal part of water.

    The 1:1 as a ratio has become accepted to mean 1+1.
    Yes that is exactly what Kodak mean, although they should also use the + symbol as Ilford does to avoid confusion. By the way, 1:0 would be for stock solution.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Yes that is exactly what Kodak mean, although they should also use the + symbol as Ilford does to avoid confusion. By the way, 1:0 would be for stock solution.
    Agreed. In discussing ratios: 1 to 1, is 1:1, is equal volumes, is 1 part A and one part b, is 1+1. 1:0 is what it says it is.
    "Get over it."

  10. #20
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    [QUOTE=Bruce Osgood;825754]In the photo community there is mixed understanding regarding ratio ( and +. Some would say that 1:1 would be undiluted, raw, neat, whatever -- stock solution.
    *******
    This is bullwinkle.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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