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  1. #11
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    *******
    I have long used eight minutes at 68 F at EI 200. It gives a good, gutsy neg with loads of shadow detail, good highlight separation, and still printable highlights. In a very contrasty light--if high tones are important, you might wish to cut back a bit--otherwise, let 'em fall where they may. I use standard ASA agitation.

    Regarding P.E.s comments. I agree with him. But I mostly use all the same few chemicals and, just for kicks, I check my spoon measurements against a scale once in a while. I have a powder scale for reloading ammunition: it is accurate to 1/10 grain. Biggest problem for this math-challenged former history major is converting those @#$ grains to grams (groan).
    Simply go here pick the from and too measures, punch in the amount, and get your results, lets you go both ways.....
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  2. #12
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    Wolfram Alpha is better now for complex unit conversions. You can ask insane things from Wolfram Alpha and it will just tell you.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #13
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    [I mis-spooled them on the reel again though and lost the last foot of my roll. I have the hardest time with 35mm film.[/QUOTE]
    *******
    Give it time. You'll get the hang of it. Most do.

    One thing about temp control with D23: Since it has just one developing ingredient, and since metol is very linear, time temp/charts work fine. I copied mine from an old Ilford Encylopedia of Photography.

    And be sure to put the replenisher in your jug whilst the film is developing. Then pour the D23 back in when development is finished. Discard any excess D23.

    If the D23 gets too gunky-looking for your taste, filter it through a coffee filter. I have heard of people using a liter of D23 for more than a year or so and it got to looking like swamp water with no apparent effect. But with 3/4 liter and just 1/3 liter of DK-25R, you should be o.k in that.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #14
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    Go to a gun store and buy a cheap powder scale or balance. They come in at under $50 and can weigh in grams or grains.

    PE

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Go to a gun store and buy a cheap powder scale or balance. They come in at under $50 and can weigh in grams or grains.

    PE
    *******
    Just don't mistake your metol for Bullseye
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
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    So is DK-25R 15g/L Sodium Metaborate, or 20g/L? I've been using 15g/L but it says here that the rate is 20:

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/De.../formulas.html
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    So is DK-25R 15g/L Sodium Metaborate, or 20g/L? I've been using 15g/L but it says here that the rate is 20:

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/De.../formulas.html
    ******
    It should be 20 gm per liter. I do not know where my head was when I posted 15 gms. Someplace not needing a safelight, to be sure. I do not see any reason why the additional cannot be added. But experts should be able to answer authoritatively.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  8. #18
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    I'm sure it's fine. I just mixed up a new batch tonight using the fancy electronic scales at work; I'll just put 5 more grams in.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #19
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    If Google was being properly correct, it would have said "50.000000 grains = 3.2300455 grams". We can use one fewer significant figures in the grains.
    In 1973 when I wrote "Kitchen Tested Soups" for Petersen's, I showed eamples of the kind of variation one might expect in volumetric measurements, both by weighing 10 samoles of each of the chemicals I used, and by demonstrating photographically the effects that variations very much greater than those I measured might have on volumetrically measured D-76. I went through the arguments that PE voiced much later. Being very precise in measurements won't eliminate most of our failures, and even 10% measurement errors won't cause most of those failures. Common sense should prevail over uncommon nonsense. If you don't know which of your measurements are critical for accuracy, it's time to do some experiments or at least some study. Even if you weigh everything to the milligram, that is useful knowledge.
    Gadget Gainer

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer View Post
    If you don't know which of your measurements are critical for accuracy....that is useful knowledge.
    After 30+ years as a construction contractor, I think this is one of the (many) universal general truths I learned. Just about anyone can make a very good home-handyman job. A true craftsman can do it with amazing speed. One of the reasons why is he inherently knows what level of precision & accuracy is needed for every component, and not everything has to be NASA ready to do a perfect job.

    On the teaspoon method, I'm limited by my primitive precision scale and something like Phenidone (used in small quantities ususally) is 53 "nip" teaspoons per 2.5grams. Coinage makes for cheap precise counterweights. (yes, I could buy a scale, but that's too easy)
    robert

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