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  1. #11

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    Is there value in freezing black and white negatives developed in staining developers (pyrocat, etc.) in order to preserve the dye stain? Has anyone done any work on this?

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    What;s the point? Raw (undeveloped) film is unstable. Cold storage slows down the deterioration. Developed film is stable.
    What he said.

    Steve
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  3. #13
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimVermont View Post
    Is there value in freezing black and white negatives developed in staining developers (pyrocat, etc.) in order to preserve the dye stain? Has anyone done any work on this?
    I don't know the composition of the dyes produced in staining development, but they seem highly permanent anyway, having viewed collections of Victorian plates that were quite intensely yellow. I doubt that there has ever been research into this.

  4. #14
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    Okay then, so how about fungus, oxidization, etc.? Surely these won't be an issue wrapped up and thrown in the freezer, right?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #15

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    Forget about what cold does to film, the best reason to put film in the frig is that you will always know where your film is at.

    And that's a most comforting reason for those of us whose age is greater than the film format we use.

    Denis K

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    I've searched around on this and haven't found a lot of information. Is it unheard of? Crazy? No benefit? Microscopic ice crystals forming and splitting film?

    It seems that if we can store unexposed and exposed-but-unprocessed film in the freezer that we should also be able to store negatives in the freezer as well. I'm thinking about archival boxes where things are relatively easy to seal and one probably won't be pulling them out at will. More recent negs being worked on are of course left out.

    Would this offer greater archival benefits than room temperature storage?
    For Black and White, they are good for over 100 years anyway, most of us aren't. Unless you have grandchildren who are big into photography, or a lot of images that would be of interest to a collection or museum, most will probably get tossed anyway. So whether they last 50 years more or 5,000,000 years more, doesn't really matter,

    The other issue of course, freezer real estate is usually very limited, so taking a half a square foot for unused film is usually not unreasonable. Taking up storage for 500 rolls of negatives, well, that's usually a lot harder, unless you have a freezer in the darkroom specifically for photographic use. Then you need to justify the power requirements of such a freezer. A film fridge is different, lots of darkrooms have one, and they have a small freezer compartment for frozen film. Many people (like me) also simply drop their stash of film in the regular freezer, where it doesn't take up much room.
    Paul Schmidt
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    The other issue of course, freezer real estate is usually very limited, so taking a half a square foot for unused film is usually not unreasonable. Taking up storage for 500 rolls of negatives, well, that's usually a lot harder, unless you have a freezer in the darkroom specifically for photographic use. Then you need to justify the power requirements of such a freezer. A film fridge is different, lots of darkrooms have one, and they have a small freezer compartment for frozen film. Many people (like me) also simply drop their stash of film in the regular freezer, where it doesn't take up much room.
    Wog, I have 10 cubic ft. of film in a dedicated chest freezer. Cost is about 30-50$/year. The reason I brought this stuff up is that I'm actually thinking of upgrading the freezer to a larger model and putting as much as I can in there.

    Also, while I don't think my negatives are anything world changing, I would like to do my best to preserve them for myself and others down the line.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Wog, I have 10 cubic ft. of film in a dedicated chest freezer. Cost is about 30-50$/year. The reason I brought this stuff up is that I'm actually thinking of upgrading the freezer to a larger model and putting as much as I can in there.

    Also, while I don't think my negatives are anything world changing, I would like to do my best to preserve them for myself and others down the line.
    10 cubic feet of film? Your supposed to shoot it, not store it! I was more thinking along the line of whats in my own freezer, about 10 rolls, most I ever have is about 15, try not to drop much below 5, now if they had a big sale and I had lots of money, then I might get more.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  9. #19

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    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/nppa...eservation.pdf

    interesting article on Corbis's cold storage facility.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by billbretz View Post
    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/nppa...eservation.pdf

    interesting article on Corbis's cold storage facility.
    Thanks heaps, Bill. That was a fascinating article in it's own right - but also confirms what I already thought: it's advantageous and safe to freeze negatives, regardless of the emulsion/type/etc.

    I just don't want my negatives to be "grandad's negatives that were really hazy and difficult to scan/capture/hologram/etc." 60 years from now (I'm 32 now).
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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