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  1. #21

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    Assuming it is all sleeved and stored in archival materials, is it then advisable to store my negatives in the freezer?

  2. #22
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Wog, I have 10 cubic ft. of film in a dedicated chest freezer. Cost is about 30-50$/year. The reason I brought this stuff up is that I'm actually thinking of upgrading the freezer to a larger model and putting as much as I can in there.
    I will trade you one cubic foot of the finest icecream for one cubic foot of film.

    I honestly had never considered this at all - it makes sense with dye stability in colour materials, but with black and white I think the benefits are probably still there, but they're not likely something you'll notice in your lifetime. Personally I dont think the future needs to see all of my rubbish exposures - if you wind up being famous, the future will worry about preserving your negatives for you.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
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    Worry less. Photograph more.

  3. #23

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    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/.../..._HiRes_v1a.pdf

    Another useful article from the wilhelm site. Deals specifically with cold storage - of color prints, too - in standard home-type fridges.

    One thing to remember about "frost-free" freezers - they have a heat unit that cycles on periodically to remove the frost on the coils, I believe. Might want to stay from that area of the fridge, but obviously food stays ok....

  4. #24
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleath View Post
    I will trade you one cubic foot of the finest icecream for one cubic foot of film.
    Great minds think alike.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #25
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    Does this ice cream contain a high density of Columbian cocaine aka "sugar?" I might consider it.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  6. #26
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Nitrate & acetate deterioration

    One reason for freezing b&w film might be to prevent or slow decomposition as happens with the old nitrate base. It seems there a similar, albeit much longer term deterioration with acetate base material, with the same 'vinegar syndrome', shrinkage and embrittlement. The Image Permanence Institute quotes only 50 years! See Wikipedia;

    A combination of low temperature and low relative humidity represents the optimum storage condition for cellulose acetate base films.
    Adelstein, P.Z., J.M. Reilly, D.W. Nishimura, and C.J. Erbland. “Stability of Cellulose Ester Base Photographic Film: Part II-Practical Storage Considerations.” SMPTE Journal 101 no. 5 (May 1992)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_base

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellulose_acetate_film

    Anybody any ideas how to find something definitive on this? And are some acetate bases better than others? And how could anyone tell one from another?

  7. #27
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Reed View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_base

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellulose_acetate_film

    Anybody any ideas how to find something definitive on this? And are some acetate bases better than others? And how could anyone tell one from another?
    Yep. This is one of the things that prompted me to think about putting it all in the freezer. Especially for long-term archives which I won't be accessing or printing anytime soon. It just seems that if one has the freezer space available, it's a no brainer.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #28
    Martin Reed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Yep. This is one of the things that prompted me to think about putting it all in the freezer. Especially for long-term archives which I won't be accessing or printing anytime soon. It just seems that if one has the freezer space available, it's a no brainer.
    I expect I was anticipating more reaction to the well-backed up fact that apparently ALL normal acetate camera film has a limited lease of life. But then most of the data is related to cine film stored in tight rolls in sealed containers. Still film stored in files with more separation is probably a different issue.

    I personally have film that goes back 45 years, so I'll find it and have a look. Has anyone one on this forum who goes back this far or further yet found any 'vinegar syndrome' going on in their film? It's easy enough to go & have a sniff.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Reed View Post
    I expect I was anticipating more reaction to the well-backed up fact that apparently ALL normal acetate camera film has a limited lease of life. But then most of the data is related to cine film stored in tight rolls in sealed containers. Still film stored in files with more separation is probably a different issue.

    I personally have film that goes back 45 years, so I'll find it and have a look. Has anyone one on this forum who goes back this far or further yet found any 'vinegar syndrome' going on in their film? It's easy enough to go & have a sniff.
    I have some that are 32 years old, smell faintly of darkroom, I don't think the lab that did them, did them all that well, but most are still viable, most are crap though that I shot when first starting out. The roll I did 2 weeks ago, smells not at all, washed using the Ilford method. Heck I have one negative here from the 1930's it smells like of the small cardboard box it's been in since at least the 1950's, I got that box from my mother probably 10 years ago, as she has no way of dealing with B&W negatives and I do.
    Paul Schmidt
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    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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