Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,519   Posts: 1,543,785   Online: 777
      
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    hoffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,897
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    57

    starting point for increasing contrast

    Howdy,

    I am still relatively new to this home processing game, having been processing for only 6 months or so. Everything I have done has pretty much been by the book. I have been using Ilford products, both with film and with developers.

    If I wanted to introduce a bit more contrast with my negs, what would be the best approach? Should I be trying to do it in camera with different filters (I have been using a red quite a bit, but need to get some others)?

    If I wanted to do it at the developing stage, what would be the best approach? If I were to increase development times, should I increase by 10% or 50% (to use some broad figures). At the moment, I am using ID-11 and Delta400

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    151
    The best route is change overall contrast is through devlopment. On-camera filters will change the contrast based on the colors in in the image (e.g. red makes red things lighter and red's compliment (blue) darker). A good starting point it about 15-20% more development.

  3. #3
    hoffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,897
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    57
    Perfect, that is exactly the information I need. I am getting a good range of tones on most of my chosen images(I have been bracketing my shots. Its all about learning what works and what doesn't for me), but I personally like to see a bit more contrast.

  4. #4
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    I'd just experiment and see what happens. IMO, the best thing to do is to shoot a whole roll (or two) of the same exact thing, on a tripod. Try a shot as the meter tells you, followed by a shot half a stop under. Then another half stop under. Then a half stop over the first shot, then another half stop over the first shot. Then do it over and over. Keep notes as to what each exposure was. Then cut the roll into three pieces, and develop each one for a different time. Then proof the entire roll and examine the contacts to see what the changes in exposure and development did. You will get to see what an underexposure, normal exposure, and overexposure look like with normal, +10%, and +20% development.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-23-2009 at 08:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #5
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    Exposure determines negative density; film development determines contrast.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #6
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,375
    Images
    4
    Increasing the development to increase contrast works - if you are taking pictures of a low contrast subject.

    If you have a normal contrast subject then increasing development time may lead to a hard-to-print or unprintable negative.

    The normal way to increase the contrast of the final photograph is to print it on a higher contrast paper and dodge/burn as needed to get the highlights and shadows back into the printable range.

    OTOH, if you want to do it just for the fun of doing it and seeing what happens - charge right ahead.

    You can get some quite lovely effects by taking pictures of a very low contrast subject and then expanding the contrast range by over developing. A. Adams took this picture at twilight - there was no sun shining - and increased the development time to get the contrast you see:




    How much to increase the development time depends on the developer and the film. TMAX and Delta films only need a 10 - 15% increase in development time to add a stop of contrast (i.e., the luminance range the film will capture (assuming normal printing) is reduced by one stop). For Tri-X/Plus-X and HP/FP films a 20-25% increase may be needed. D-76 (ID-11) and Xtol are the best developer choices if you are going to bump development.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 07-23-2009 at 08:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  7. #7
    RJS
    RJS is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    246
    Try to get a bok on basic photography. There are many on the market, used and new, and do some reading. You will find answers to most of your questions and be way ahead.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    Henry Horenstein: http://www.buy.com/prod/black-white-.../33905960.html

    The book all my college students use.

    Exposure controls density; development controls contrast.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,169
    Images
    2
    Although film development controls contrast, there will be occasions that a portion of the print requires more or less contrast. In that case variable contrast paper and filters for the enlarger or a variable contrast light source such as one from Aristo Grid Lamp Products give you such control. You can also reduce or increase overall contrast for a negative that is too little or too much in the contrast department.
    Jeffreyg

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    588
    Dektol for 1.5 minutes. If you don't care for the results, at least you'll know you can use Dektol for your negatives. And if you ever find yourself stranded on an island and that's the only developer available . . .
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin