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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    Do these films work well in D-76 (or ID-11)? How about Rodinal?
    Yes, they do, and quite well. PanF+ does very well with D-76 or ID-11 1+3. Delta 3200 seems to like more development than recommended for a given exposure index. I don't use much of the fast stuff, but it seems to me that I'm happier when I follow the recommendation for developing one stop underexposed that I've actually done. Expose at 3200 and develop for 6400, that sort of thing. Everything else works very well at the Ilford recommended times. Tweak it a bit from there if you think it's necessary. I doubt you will if your thermometer is close to spec and your agitation technique is close to the recommended norm.

    Don't like Rodinal for general use with these or most other films.
    Frank Schifano

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    So I am on the lookout for some new films to experiment with.

    I have completely ignored Ilford films up until now. I've tried most Kodak films, the Foma stuff, and Agfa (sniff). Now I am ready to try Ilfords films. The thing is they have quite an assortment, and I don't really know where to start. Buying 5 rolls of each type is an expensive endeavor, especially if I don't like the film.

    So, I am hoping of someone could tell me what each film is (in terms of is it like Tri-X, etc) so I can whittle some down.

    I shoot mostly landscape and "fine-art" work, so good tonal range is very important. I love grain (I guess I could clarify I love Plus-X grain). I am looking for a good film I can shoot hand-held with my Mamiya 645 (80mm lens fitted), obviously in good lighting conditions.

    Which Ilford films have nice grain, tonal range, and respond well to pushing? Is there an excellent film in Ilford's range that I should be shot in the foot for not using yet?

    I usually develop my film in D-76 because I know how it works, but I am currently starting to use Rodinal as well. I just haven't wrapped my head around Rodinal like I have D-76.

    Thanks everyone!
    I had been shooting Trix 8x10 when shooting my sex worker white background images, this recent trip I shot both HP5 and Trix. So far have not noticed much of a difference using these films under my lighting conditions and using the same development chemistry (D76)/times (same tank also). The Ilford neg looked a tad denser and a bit less contrasty than the Tri-x negative. When neg scanning I noticed no differences (have yet to print the negs). I think I am heading towards Ilford as you are, cheaper film, 25 sheets to a box not 10 and better customer support. Ilford seems to give a damn about their customers.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerryyaum View Post
    ...Ilford seems to give a damn about their customers.
    That is exactly why I am considering moving to Ilford. The film is a little cheaper (not much in 120 or 35mm, but every little bit counts), but the big thing to me is customer service.

    It's the same reason I shop exclusively with Freestyle for film and supplies; even though it takes a week to get here in NC, I want to support manufacturers and resellers who support traditional photography.

    They are both advertisers and have a presence on APUG as well, which means they are really committed to traditional photography, they just don't talk about it.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    ...Do these films work well in D-76 (or ID-11)? How about Rodinal?
    YES!

  5. #15

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    for the last 6 to 8 months, my film and developer of choice has been HP5+ and Rodinal 1:50 (printed on Slavic Unibrom Grade 2 paper). I have two scans of prints on my flicker if you want to see how it looks (I know, scans arent perfect, but it's the best I can do ). I'll be printing more in the darkroom at school tomorrow. Hopefully I'll get some more scans up in a few days.

    Despite claims to the contrary, I dont find the grain to be overbearing, but it is there. If you're not opposed to a bit of grain, I think HP5+ and Rodinal 1:50 is a good combo, and it looks better in medium and large format (Yeah, I shoot 35mm )


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/3718922...7617447740080/


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/3718922...7617447740080/

  6. #16
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    You will like the Ilford films. They are different from their Kodak "equivalents". In some ways they're better, in some worse. I tend to prefer them to Kodak, although that may be in part because Ilford films were the first black-and-white films I tried. (The friend that got me interested in photography used FP4 and HP5, so they were a good place to start and the results were good enough that I didn't try any alternatives for a few years.)

    Pan-F Plus has become a bit of a sleeper film for me. I would never have told you it was my favourite film (until recently) but I keep getting good results from it. I find now that I tend to prefer it when I can work with its slow speed, which is a good chunk of the time. FP4 Plus and HP5 Plus take up a good amount of the rest of the work I do.

    The Delta films are also nice and I have had good luck with them but I have come to really like using PMK as my main developer and it works better with the non-T-grain Ilford films. I have a bunch of Delta 100 in the freezer and I am going to give it a good kick with PMK to see if I was, perhaps, clueless with it on the first go.

    Delta 3200 is great although I usually shoot it at EI 800. Fresher is better. It builds base fog quickly, and it's noticeably foggier at expiry than it is when fresh. If you can get it fresh and use it quickly, it's at its peak and it is delicious.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  7. #17

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    In very general terms:

    - I find conventional-grain Ilford films somewhat sharper than their Kodak counterparts
    - I find coventional-grain Ilford films equivalent in grain or slightly grainier than their Kodak counterparts
    - I find convenitional-grain Ilford films to have slightly lower overall contrast than their Kodak counterparts
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  8. #18
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    FP4 is close enough to Plus-X that you can use either.
    HP5 is close enough to Tri-X that you can use either.

    Delta 3200 is lovely lovely film. The rest I never really investigated. That's all the advice I can offer, plus that you may not get to know the inns and outs of each film until you've used it exclusively for a good long time. It can be false impression to base what you like / dislike based on a 5-roll affair. Of course you'll get a first impression, but have you asked yourself why you're using all these different films? All it will do is make printing a lot harder for you.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #19
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    FP4 is close enough to Plus-X that you can use either.
    HP5 is close enough to Tri-X that you can use either.

    Delta 3200 is lovely lovely film. The rest I never really investigated. That's all the advice I can offer, plus that you may not get to know the inns and outs of each film until you've used it exclusively for a good long time. It can be false impression to base what you like / dislike based on a 5-roll affair. Of course you'll get a first impression, but have you asked yourself why you're using all these different films? All it will do is make printing a lot harder for you.
    You can probably gauge a film with only a couple of rolls, if you like it, you like it, if you don't, you don't. So you pick a film you like, and then you copious amounts of it, and really learn it, and just when you think you really, really know it, the manufacturer will either:

    a) discontinue it.
    b) reformulate it, so you need to start all over.
    c) change all the brand names so you don't know what is what.

    :rolleyes:
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  10. #20

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    I use HP5 in 4x5 because Kodak doesn't have Tri-x 400 in that niche market. With my cameras, shutters, developers, I can only get 200 out of HP5 in 4x5 or 120.

    I know others shoot at 400, or faster, but it doesn't work with my stuff/habits. Nice film, but Tri-X 400 its not. (some will say that is a good thing)

    Mike

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