Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,229   Posts: 1,532,847   Online: 978
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,830
    Blog Entries
    1
    MY favorite is unadulterated coffee. I first used it when our children were visiting. They made a pot of coffee, drank 1/2 of it and then left for the day with the pot sitting on the warmer. A few hours later I noticed the horrid strong coffee smell and decided to try it as a film developer. I made a couple of test shots at full fim speed for the purpose.
    Development by inspection for 20 minutes with intermittent agitation. The negatives appear thin, but due to the stain, print beautifully.
    This was done a few years ago before the current craze to alter coffee into a full fledged chemically charged developer. I added nothing to the coffee. A little carbonate would likely have made it more active, but I was not interested in that.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  2. #12
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,372
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    The negatives appear thin ... I added nothing to the coffee.
    Hmmm. So maybe the bicarb I added to the coffee did nothing but make a foul stench.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  3. #13
    Aurum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Landrover Central UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    923
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Well, back to the bicarb...

    If you bake baking soda it lets off carbon dioxide and turns into sodium carbonate.

    It's how it makes a cake rise - letting off the CO2 with heat.

    30 minutes in the oven at 350, just like a cake. If one cooks a lot of it it will sort of 'boil' as it decomposes.
    If you want some giggles 1 part Citric acid crystals, 1 part bicarb, both dry.

    Wizz up in a blender for a few seconds....
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Hmmm. So maybe the bicarb I added to the coffee did nothing but make a foul stench.

    i am thinking the soda ash is just to make it smell bad too
    im empty, good luck

  5. #15
    McFortner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stockbridge, Georgia, U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    317
    Images
    42
    If I remember right, it's the caffeic acid that provides the main ingredient to the development. It is more prevalent in the cheaper Robusta beans used in instant coffee. The washing soda not only helps to bring out the caffeic acid, but lowers the pH to a more favorable range to develop the film. I believe the vitamin C is to keep the contrast down.

    Hmm, gonna have to mix up a batch the next roll of film I need to develop....

  6. #16
    DutchShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    64
    Gonna buy some instant coffee tomorrow...for the first time in my life
    So now it seems that this not-so-tasty-brown-liquid has a reason to exist!

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,246
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by McFortner View Post
    If I remember right, it's the caffeic acid that provides the main ingredient to the development. It is more prevalent in the cheaper Robusta beans used in instant coffee.
    I actually have a bag of green robusta beans sitting in my "random photo projects" cabinet waiting to be roasted for this purpose. Hitherto I've used Folger's (a widespread American brand which is about as bad as it's possible for coffee to be without a truck stop wrapped around it), with results that on the whole I really like. It seems to be approximately speed-maintaining with most films, and to give interesting tonality with many of them.

    I've struggled a bit with intermittent uneven-development problems---edge overdevelopment, like an agitation problem, but changes to my agitation regime seem to have no effect on it one way or another---and base fog, and to handle the latter I've been experimenting with adding potassium bromide to the standard "Caffenol C" recipe that was posted upthread. At 0.35 g KBr per 16 oz. of developer, I got a beautiful, fog-free roll the first time I tried it, but the second time the fog returned along with the uneven-development problems. So I don't yet understand what's causing the problems, but the addition of an antifoggant shows *some* promise.

    My current theory is that the unevenness is due to too much washing soda making the developer act too fast at the beginning, and that backing off on the washing soda may help with that aspect. So my next move is to try to settle on a recipe with less washing soda and then dial in an appropriate amount of potassium bromide, and see if I can get reasonably consistent results that way.

    But the thing about caffenol developers is that they really lend themselves to this sort of experimentation. Feel like trying something new? Go out and burn a roll of film on whatever subjects come to hand, mix up the brew du jour and see what happens. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, sometimes the results are a serendipitous catastrophe. I imagine this process is a bit as it must have felt to be an early photographer, dependent on your own alchemical skills and a mix of good and bad hearsay to get the images to come out, and always a little unsure what would happen when you tried something that hadn't been done exactly the same way before. Good stuff.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,081
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    But the thing about caffenol developers is that they really lend themselves to this sort of experimentation. Feel like trying something new? Go out and burn a roll of film on whatever subjects come to hand, mix up the brew du jour and see what happens. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, sometimes the results are a serendipitous catastrophe. I imagine this process is a bit as it must have felt to be an early photographer, dependent on your own alchemical skills and a mix of good and bad hearsay to get the images to come out, and always a little unsure what would happen when you tried something that hadn't been done exactly the same way before. Good stuff.

    -NT
    i agree with this completely!
    using caffenol is magical.
    and one of the reasons i love to use
    it is because it isn't as nasty and toxic as other
    photographic chemicals tend to be ...
    one of the thing that keeps me away from wet plate
    (even though it is beautiful watching that negative image
    just turn into a positive image as it fixes before your very eyes)
    is the chemicals are deadly toxic, or explosive &C.
    caffenol is just the right mix of crazy chemistry / alchemy
    to keep me gleeful as i look at my film hanging ...
    if i could only find a earth friendly fixer i would be as happy as
    a pig in ...
    im empty, good luck

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,246
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    if i could only find a earth friendly fixer i would be as happy as a pig in ...
    ...fertiliser! :-)

    Actually, it turns out that ammonium thiosulfate, AKA rapid fixer, is the active ingredient in some nitrogen fertilisers. I'm well aware that fertilisers are not *the* most environment-friendly chemicals going, but it does suggest that you shouldn't worry much more about fixer waste from the darkroom than about fertiliser waste from the garden.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    513
    The problem with fixer isn't the active chemical, it's the silver it dissolves.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin