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  1. #21
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    My experience has been that the motor wind cameras I have owned and used have a clutch to prevent damage at the end of the roll. None of my motor drive or motor wind cameras has ever ripped the film.

    HOWEVER, the issue of film damage to the camera may be more related to manual advance cameras. The only times I have ripped the film have been with manual advance cameras when I come to the end of the roll and, because of the mechanical advantage of the winding mechanism, I can't tell I have reached the end.

  2. #22
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    I would agree that I have not seen either a Canon EOS or a Pentax MX with winder, not to mention several point and shoots damage any regular film at the end of the roll. so I would imagine that hey would have no trouble with Polyester.

    In another life I used to use microfilm, which was coated on a 2 mil poly base. Even with the thin base we could not break the film with our hands without using some karate moves (one fellow could do it by wrapping it around both hands and making them fly apart, breaking the film when he reached the end of the three foot sample)

    Movie Negative is Normally on acetate, which is easier to splice and thus edit. Most of the intermediate and print stocks are poly.

    Agfa in Belgium basicaly only produces Poly stock, I have heard that EFKE was using blank film base from Filmotec in Wolfen Germany, and they may have dropped making acetate base. Any film from those sources will be on Poly base.

    Poly WILL light pipe. I collect 16mm films and you can tell a print on Poly as it is brightly lit when held up to the light, while an acetate print barely shows any light through it. That is on clear film. Kodak puts an antistatic coating on their Motion Picture print stock
    http://motion.kodak.com/US/en/motion...Films/2383.htm

    My old splicer for acetate film can sometimes not manage to cut poly film.

    I expct taht in the future we will all have to use use sharp scissors in the darkroom.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    HOWEVER, the issue of film damage to the camera may be more related to manual advance cameras. The only times I have ripped the film have been with manual advance cameras when I come to the end of the roll and, because of the mechanical advantage of the winding mechanism, I can't tell I have reached the end.
    With respect, even with the mechanical advantage of a film advance lever, one would have to be rather over-enthusiastic not to get the feedback of increased resistance at the end of a roll. I will hold up my hands and say that the only times (very few) that I've ever stripped a sprocket hole or two have been in trying to eke that 37th or 38th exposure out of a film (and I've given up trying that for the last twenty years as it's not worth the hassle!)

    Steve

  4. #24
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Michael, you're full of crap. Thanks for the co-ordinated Rollei/Maco response.

    I rather suspect that you and a few other new members posting recently on threads regarding Rollei/Maco products are all affiliated to the company in some way. I have informed the Moderators.

    Yes it's true certain cameras such as surveillance, traffic and microfilm cameras are designed to be used with Polyester based films, but they are heavily over engineered compared to conventional 35mm film cameras.

    But all you've written doesn't make Polyester film base safe for conventional camera use.

    Ian
    The post I was replying to has now been removed from the thread, so apologies if my reply above seems out of context.

    Sean has made a comment in the Feedback section.

    Ian

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