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  1. #1
    wogster's Avatar
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    Developer tank woes.

    I have a plastic GAF developing tank, has an adjustable plastic reel. The problem is that film is starting to stick in the reel about half way along, I think the springs behind the ball bearings are starting to go. I bought this tank new in 1980, so after 29 years, I would expect it to need replacing.

    I have noticed the clear side of the reel is sort of brownish now, it's always been cleaned well, I think perhaps it's discoloured from use over the years or the plastic is starting to decay.

    I don't think GAF is around anymore, or at least isn't in the photographic business anymore. I either need to find new reels that will fit this tank or replace the tank with something else. The one aspect I have never liked about it, is that you can't do inversion agitation with it. I noticed a couple of different tanks that are available.

    There is the Paterson System 4, and the AP Universal tanks, I believe that these can be used with a single reel or 2 reels at a time. Anyone know which is the better tank or reel. Wondering about stainless steel, but don't know if I could figure out how to load the reels.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  2. #2
    trexx's Avatar
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    I am a big fan of the AP tanks. The reels have a flange where the film is loaded and really helps with 120. I use them as inversion tanks and have little leakage. Less of a fan of the Paterson, but I am sure you'll find lots who are.

    My favorite plastic tank is the JOBO the reels load without ball bearings. But are hard to find.
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The AP reels also fit the Paterson tanks (and vice versa). I too prefer the AP reels for 120, because of the flanges. I've never seen an AP tank that will take more than one 120 roll at a time though.

    For 35mm, I prefer and use the stainless steel reels. I keep trying the stainless steel reels for 120, but am only slowly getting to the point where I can rely on my ability to load them.

    I too used to use the GAF tank - about 1970 or so I guess . I think it was only last year that I discarded the combination agitator and thermometer that came with it.

    If you decide to go the stainless steel route I would recommend you keep the GAF, if only for it's 127 film capability.

    Matt

  4. #4
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    I use the FreeStyle home brand of stainless steel tanks with Hewes stainless steel reels for 35mm and 120. Once I learned to load the reels correctly, I have had not problems with them. I would recommend stainless steel tanks and reels.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Give your reels a soak in biological washing powder, and scrub the grooves with an old toothbrush, then soak them in strong household bleach (sodium hypochlorite), then another good clean with the toothbrush and wash well.

    That removes the general build up of crud that forms on the spirals over the years, I'm using tanks bought in the late 60's early 70's and they all load easily.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    You don't say what format/formats etc you need. Or volume.

    I like the Jobo tanks because they are so flexible OTOH I never had a problem with the latest Patersons.

  7. #7
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    I use both paterson system 4 and AP, but I only use AP reels at the moments. They are fool proof for loading and far easier to load than paterson reels especially for 120. I saw very fine hama and jobo reels on the market but I haven't tried them yet.
    I prefer to use paterson tank with AP reels (500 cc per 120) My AP tank needs more solution per film (590 cc per 120) that is the only think I don't like about AP tanks.

  8. #8
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    You don't say what format/formats etc you need. Or volume.

    I like the Jobo tanks because they are so flexible OTOH I never had a problem with the latest Patersons.
    Sorry, only using 35mm at the moment..... Wondering about the SS route, I would hate to buy it though and find I have too much trouble with getting the reels to work. I am a low volume shooter, so the chances of me doing more then 1 rolls at a time is remote, would like the ability to do 2 rolls at a time though.
    Last edited by wogster; 07-30-2009 at 08:19 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: stupid fingers
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  9. #9
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Give your reels a soak in biological washing powder, and scrub the grooves with an old toothbrush, then soak them in strong household bleach (sodium hypochlorite), then another good clean with the toothbrush and wash well.

    That removes the general build up of crud that forms on the spirals over the years, I'm using tanks bought in the late 60's early 70's and they all load easily.

    Ian
    ******
    Ian is right. That should work. On the off chance it does not, the same tank was sold after Ansco/Gaf as a Star-D.
    I have both original Ansco and the StarD
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  10. #10
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Give your reels a soak in biological washing powder, and scrub the grooves with an old toothbrush, then soak them in strong household bleach (sodium hypochlorite), then another good clean with the toothbrush and wash well.

    That removes the general build up of crud that forms on the spirals over the years, I'm using tanks bought in the late 60's early 70's and they all load easily.

    Ian
    Washing powder? You mean the stuff used to do laundry, dishes, something else?
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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