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  1. #1

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    How do you develop B&W film?

    Hi...sorry to annoy people who may read posts like this regularly.... but Ive searched and am struggling to find a simple explanation of what I need (chemicles and hardware) to develop B&W film.

    Maybe Im choosing the wrong search words.

    Any advice...or if you know of previous threads on apug that answer the question would be awesome.

  2. #2

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    This is a really good place to start:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/...rocessing.html

    Best!

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Go to the Ilford website it's all there and extremely well written & illustrated

    This link shoul take you to the section.

    Ian

  4. #4
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Go to the Ilford website it's all there and extremely well written & illustrated

    This link shoul take you to the section.

    Ian
    Here is a link to a PDF of all of this on their web site: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf

    Also, APUGger JBrunner has some nice videos on his site showing how he develops 120 film, but the bulk of the info would apply to 35mm as well if you are doing that. http://www.jasonbrunner.com/videos.html

  5. #5

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    There's a ten minute video on this page. It might help explain the basics . . .
    http://www.prophotolife.com/2008/07/...for-beginners/


    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  6. #6
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    http://stores.lulu.com/store.php?fAcctID=4177982

    CiM's storefront. July issue has an article on DIY B&W processing.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Sorensen View Post
    Here is a link to a PDF of all of this on their web site: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf

    Also, APUGger JBrunner has some nice videos on his site showing how he develops 120 film, but the bulk of the info would apply to 35mm as well if you are doing that. http://www.jasonbrunner.com/videos.html
    Thanks Paul, I've Bookmarked that link.

    That Ilford PDF is by far the best first place to start.

    Ian

  8. #8
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Poorly.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #9

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    Film developing is pretty simple. There are some good references above, but you can probably find a book at your public library that has detailed instructions with pictures. That helps. For equipment, you need a developing tank. Developing tanks are available at moderate prices from all the mail order photo stores (e.g. Freestyle, Adorama, etc.). It's a good idea to sacrifice a fresh roll of film to practice loading the tank in the light before you try it in the dark. Loading the tank isn't hard, but it can get tricky and frustrating. You obviously need a place that you can make completely dark so that you can load the tank without getting light on the film. If you do not have a closet or somewhere you can make completely dark (no light leaks at all), you can buy a "changing bag" from the same suppliers. That will give you a safe, convenient place to load film. You will need a place to hang the film up to dry. I use an indoor clothesline. A coat hanger in a spacious closet will also work. The drying area should be as dust free as possible. You also need clips to hang the film. Clips are specially made for this purpose, and they are excellent, but I generally use clothespins (the wooden ones work best). You will probably find that a small plastic funnel will come in handy, too. A two cup measuring cup (standard kitchen equipment) will be needed for measuring the solutions, and a couple of quart containers will be needed to hold them. You do not need a formal darkroom. A kitchen of bathroom sink will do fine for film developing. For chemicals, you need film developer and fixer. The liquid concentrate types are easiest for the beginner. (HC-110 is a good developer, and there are several liquid fixer concentrates out there that you can use.) You can use either a stop bath or a water rinse between the developer and fixer - both work.

  10. #10
    Aurum's Avatar
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    ^^WHS^^
    My 10p worth as a bit of extra colour, is that Developing tanks can come in both Stainless steel and plastic.
    Stainless is supposed to be more robust, however, the plastic ones tend to be a bit cheaper, and I personally find the plastic reels with the "Ratchet action" easier to load. Either way it comes down to familiarity and practice. If in doubt, get you hands on the cheapest roll of film you can and practice on something disposible.

    Also, changing bags might sound a bit of a faff, but compared to having to blackout an area to work in, its easy. When I load film into developing tanks using a changing bag, I sit on the sofa watching the TV. One hint, often overlooked. Take your watch off while using a changing bag. ESPECIALLY if it has a luminous dial, or is a digital that is backlit (Don't ask!)

    Also a tip if you need to open a 35mm cartridge when the leader has been wound in. You don't need a fancy opener or piece of kit. A bottle opener that pings the crown caps off beer bottles is ideal (Ones with sound effects optional)
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

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