Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,546   Posts: 1,572,967   Online: 1029
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,912
    Images
    65
    On test strips:

    If you are reasonably familiar with a set of negatives you can make a guess. e.g. you have already made a good print at 8 seconds, but you see the next negative is slightly denser and would probably work well with a 1/4 stop more exposure at 9.5 seconds.

    Test strips can be useful in certain situations (say if you aren't too sure about the tone of a blue sky area in the print), but at other times can be a hindrance, for example, you have image with a lot of varying detail and looking at only one part of the negative might mean you ignore another important areas of the photograph.

    Tom

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    No, you need to make test strips with the same paper. You also need to take the dry down effect into account.
    BTW, it's test strips, not sheets. You just need to pick the correct part of the image. Something with the full tonal scale.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    513
    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    No, you need to make test strips with the same paper. You also need to take the dry down effect into account.
    BTW, it's test strips, not sheets. You just need to pick the correct part of the image. Something with the full tonal scale.
    So I suppose i could surrender a few sheets to the cause and make 14 1" wide test strips for a sheet.

    I understand how to make test strips. It took me quite a bit of practice to be able to choose the region of the negative that has the full tonal scale, but once I was able to spot it my "signal to noise" ratio as they say has gone to maybe 3 sheets of bad prints to one perfect one, assuming a properly exposed and developed negative.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    One inch wide is a bit narrow IMHO. Anyway, in order to choose the best part of the frame a proper contact is important for those of us who can't eyeball the negative.

    EDIT: I almost forgot it! In case you don't know about it, the minimum time for maximum black should be your starting point for test strips. You only need to do this once for a specific film you've developed and specific print size.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    156
    I feel like if your really trying to get a good print there is no way around blasting through a few sheets (on the low end) of paper to get there. You cant buy a box of 50 sheets of paper and expect to make 50 final prints. If I were you I would get a multi-grade paper, this way you can print the standard way you were describing by using one contrast filter, but you can also have more control over your prints by split filtering (with split filtering you make two exposures on the paper, first on with a 5 filter, to print in the blacks, and then an exposure using a 0/1 filter to print in the highlights) The control this gives you is really amazing. An other thing to take into consideration with fiber paper is dry down, what this means is when the paper is wet the image will appear brighter (especially in the highlights), 10-20% in my experiences, so to get the best evaluation of the print/test is to squeegee it when evaluating it, there will still be some dry down, but this gets you much closer to what the dry print will look like. Hope this helps.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    513
    The issue is I simply can't afford to make 10+ prints of a photograph before I get the one for the critique. Maybe if I were being paid for the photograph, but as it is I am paying $85 just for the privilege of taking the class and using their Dektol. I have to pay for everything relating to film, paper, mat board, etc. Not to mention tuition.

    When I'm paying $60 for 50 sheets of paper, I can't afford to only get 5 or 6 good prints from the pack. How can I save paper but still get good prints? I'm certain a lot of it has to do with having good negatives from the start. I have learned that a good negative can produce an excellent print in less than 5 sheets many times, while a negative that is "off" may never produce a good print (at least in my current capacity).

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    fairfield county, Ct.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,825
    Images
    24

    prints

    if you want to be able to print well then stick with one film and developer...it will give you the feedback that you need....I can usually make a print in 5 or less sheets but I KNOW what I'm looking for as have been printing for over 30 years....my best advice is to use full sheets of paper...the day I went from strips to using a full sheet I began to make the best prints ever....so you might save a few sheets but hey it's up to you....buy a copy of Bruce Barnbaums darkroom book and read it!! this process is a learning curve so do not expect to do it in one day...
    Best, Peter

  8. #18
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,103
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    When I'm paying $60 for 50 sheets of paper, I can't afford to only get 5 or 6 good prints from the pack. How can I save paper but still get good prints? I'm certain a lot of it has to do with having good negatives from the start. I have learned that a good negative can produce an excellent print in less than 5 sheets many times, while a negative that is "off" may never produce a good print (at least in my current capacity).
    I think that around 25 to 40 good prints from the 50 sheets would be a very good result, and if you're fairly new at printing you should even accept 10 or 15 good prints as a rather good result. It comes down to your skill at interpreting the test strips. If you master that early on, then you'll maximise the number of good prints. It also helps if many of the negs have similar exposure.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Kuiper Belt
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    291
    When I'm working towards a good 16x20 print, I use gradually larger and larger pieces as test strips. I might start out with 1x2" [and single exposure of the whole piece - or equivalent area if a true strip] always in the most critical place - like a person's eyes if a portrait. I can't imagine any way to make a good final print without gradually, slowly honing in on the absolute best I can do. Bit-by-bit, I refine my exposure and contrast. Once I'm up to 4x4" pieces with a single exposure, I'm pretty sure that I have everything right. Sometimes, I'll make an 8x10 of the most critical area before using the final 16x20 paper. That 8x10 helps confirm the overall feel of the exposure and contrast.

    I agree with the advice in that I could likely make a better print if I were to make full size ones and gradually work towards the best I could do. My suggestions are for an economical compromise that works for me. So it all depends on how good is "good".

    The key for me is to decide which part of the print is critical. It's very difficult for me [successfully/economically] to be chasing two or three areas - trying to optimize all at once.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    513
    I can definitely respect your position, Peter. I have been using Plus-X and D-76 for a while now and I know how it works. I'm now starting to move into Ilford and Rodinal waters, before uncharted. When I worked with D-76 I didn't worry if I accidentally overcooked my film for 30-45 seconds or if my temperature was off by a few degrees, or whatever, because I knew how my film would react and what to do when that happened.

    Now I guess I've been reading too much because I'm using the Arista EDU Ultra film (ghastly stuff so far, at least to me) in Rodinal. I'll probably go back to what I know, especially when I'm working with paper that is so much more expensive. I don't really have the luxury of printing 15 "alignment sheets" anymore.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin