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  1. #11

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    The Sponge VS ...

    A print roller. Now that's an alternative, a break
    from the constant druming of the squeegees.

    For myself the sponge can't be beat. A sponge will
    soak up water, not spread it about. Any flat water
    proof surface will suffice. Also, a sponge will
    draw water from a surface leaving it drier
    to start.

    Photo Grade sponges are available. Household
    sponges work well. For 98 cents what
    have you to loose? Dan

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    What about instead of a sponge using ShamWow? Steve
    Very absorbent. Such a material may find room in some
    darkrooms. A sponge though is easy to grip. Easy
    to squeeze dry. Dan

  3. #13
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Soak in Pakosol used at print-flattening dilution. Drain. Pat dry with cotton bath towel. Dry with an Arkay drier - usually face-to-canvas but sometimes face-to-ferrotype. Flatten in dry-mount press.

    The Pakosol gives a nice 'hand' to the paper.

    For RC, just pat dry with a towel and leave face up to dry on a new towel.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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  4. #14
    Rick A's Avatar
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    After rinsing, I check for residual hypo, then two mins in hypo clear, and rerinse if necessary. Then its off to a large plate glass for the squeegee. I have used a roller in the past, but now I only use one if I am ferrotyping, that's a must for that. I usually dry on screens, even though I have a print dryer.I own two dryers, one I've had for years, and one brand new in the box that I picked up a couple of years ago, and still havent used.
    Rick

  5. #15

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    Jan 2006
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    Oklahoma
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    Here's a picture of that that wringer thingy I've been using. Good for prints up to 11x14. Made by Falcon Safety Products Inc, Mountainside, NJ.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dsc02979.jpg  
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  6. #16
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    For me, the last steps I take before drying:
    • Selenium Tone 1:19 for archival permanence;
    • Final rinse to remove any excess toner;
    • Sponge dry with a soft sponge;
    • Place image between two pieces of blotting paper to dry naturally.

    Just printed up some fiber based prints and the blotting paper really stopped them from curling badly!

  7. #17

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    For me, from out of the wash to either presented or stored:

    1. place print face first onto my bathroom mirror (after cleaning mirror with plain water)
    2. squeegee the back
    3. air dry wherever I can find room in the bathroom/laundry room. Sometimes this means tacking the prints into the already-battered drywall (only bit of drywall in the whole house, and proud of it...so proud of it that I fill it with holes to pin up my prints to dry ).
    4. flatten between mount boards in a dry mount press once dry
    5. observe print to see if it is worth any more work or if it needs to be re printed
    6. spot
    7. If a print is going to be matted, framed, hung, etc., I just dry mount it straight away and make an overmat to protect the print surface (usually with a gutter). If I am not sure what I'll be doing with them, I keep them loose in old paper boxes.

    P.S. This is assuming that I do not bleach or tone the print. If so, insert after number 5: perform other chemical processes as desired, then rewash and start the above list over from the top.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 08-04-2009 at 01:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18
    Wade D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I use the sme dryer and I have never been able to face the print towards the ferrotype. How do you do that without the emulsion sticking to it?

    Steve
    A bit higher temp might be indicated if the prints stick when they are face to ferrotype. The prints should 'pop' off the dryer at the end of the cycle. I don't know about other surfaces but with F surface paper this should give you a good glossy.

  9. #19
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I use the sme dryer and I have never been able to face the print towards the ferrotype [without sticking].
    The 'tin' has to be very, very clean - I scrub it with Windex and Bon Ami. It also has to be scratch and haze free. They used to sell ferrotype wax/polish to minimize sticking but I use Carnuba car wax instead. Pakosol (I don't know if they still make it, you can use dilute hexylene glycol instead) helps quite a bit with ferrotyping.

    There is all sorts of advice on temperature. I used to ferrotype prints in the old days at room temperature - just roll the print on the tin and prop it up against the wall, it would pop off when dry. Some folks like to have the tin so hot it sizzles when they plop the print on. I find medium-hot works fine.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

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