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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    please recomennd an Organic Chemistry text

    I'm looking for an undergraduate level, relatively comprehensive and self contained introductory Organic Chemistry text.

    Any recommendations?

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    If its just for reference, you might be able to pick up a used one at a college library for a buck or so. Stryer was the one I used to have.

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    ...not just for reference. I would like to learn some of this stuff. My formal education was predominately in Mathematics. I have only a minimal background (two semesters) in General Chem. Now, I find myself wishing to understand how and why some of these things we use combine and what happens when they decompose...and why.

    I commute with a guy who is a research chemist. Today we were talking about Metol and Hydroquinone...and he was drawing little diagrams and...well, it's all terribly interesting but, I felt like he was speaking greek about half the time....and I think it is probably not really that hard to get at least some of the fundamentals.

  4. #4

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    Morrison and Boyd - it was the one I used in college (mid-80s), and it seems pretty reasonable. Morrison and Boyd was a popular text and there were several editions from the 60s to the 80s.

    When I was in high school, I used to peruse Fieser and Fieser (from the 1950s), and it seems like a good text.

    Try Google books to see if there is one you like.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  5. #5

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    I dont think photography rates big in the world of organic chemistry.I have "Organic Chemistry" pp1187 by Stanley Pine but can only find 9 lines on hydroquinone.
    A specialist book like "Basic Photo Science" by H J Walls and G G Attridge may have more chemistry of relevance in it.

  6. #6
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Organic chem is a very broad field, my suggestion would be to find a text that is tailored specifically to film-related chemistry, with enough of the p-chem and solid state physics that you need to make real headway. There should be some focused review articles on this subject, maybe Ron can suggest some.

    Not to dissuade you from launching into a textbook, but... the standard organic texts are big and thick and dreaded by most of the students I know! And the emphasis is mostly bio-organic, not the kind of stuff that is most relevant to film chemistry. I mean, you may not get more than "there are some very strong reducers and oxidizers" and that's about it.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  7. #7
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Okay here you go, maybe this is targeted enough...

    http://www.springer.com/chemistry/or...-3-540-20988-1
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #8
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Try Haist. It is tailored to photographic chemistry and includes both organic and inorganic.

    PE

  9. #9

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    I agree with Photo Engineer. This is a FANTASTIC book if you can find it.
    However if you just need a Chemistry book try ebay there at over 3000 listed now, may sell for under $5.
    Also not all photo Chemistry is Organic Chemistry. AgX has no carbon neither does KI, etc. So don't write off an inorganic chemistry text.
    Finally remember the library is free. Your local on may be able to order in the Haist Book.

  10. #10
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    Grant has a number of copies of the reprint of the 1st edition that he will sell. His address is here on APUG in several places. I give you a 50:50 chance of finding it though. Then I will have to go look it up when I get 10 or 20 notes asking me please for help as the APUG searches have failed them.

    I have begun to fear posting this factoid.

    PE

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