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  1. #11
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Yesterday was the first time I developed a roll of film (HP5) in my photography class. We practiced for a while inserting the film onto the reels prior to the real thing. But I still had a bit of a problem after the dry run. Wound up with a burn on about the third or fourth frame.

    Thinking maybe I should buy a reel and continue to practice with a outdated and expired roll of Long's 35mm film.
    All of us have been there and done that. Some of us still run into a problem every once in a while.

    Welcome to the darkside. Keep on working on it, you will get the hang after a while.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    ********
    Back when our college mentor started us out in darkroom, we were sent to the dorm on Friday with a length of film and a plastic reel (FR or Yankee?) and told to come back being able to load film in the dark.

    I practiced and practiced in my dorm room, with my eyes closed. Monday, I passed my "test." Now, almost fifty years later, I sit there in the dark loading reels------still with my eyes closed.
    This seems to come up a lot. So last week, when I was loading film after a long absence, I was paying attention to what I did. I was a little surprised to note that I had my eyes wide open. That is, they were open until I ran into a problem and was trying to feel where the film had jumped the track. When I finished doing that, I realized that my eyes were clamped shut.

  3. #13
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLawson View Post
    This seems to come up a lot. So last week, when I was loading film after a long absence, I was paying attention to what I did. I was a little surprised to note that I had my eyes wide open. That is, they were open until I ran into a problem and was trying to feel where the film had jumped the track. When I finished doing that, I realized that my eyes were clamped shut.
    Hmmm ... an open and shut case ... well we will not need CSI to follow the evidence.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #14

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    my first attempt at loading a 5x4 film holder in the dark still makes me shudder with horror........ (how rubbish is that??)

  5. #15

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    Welcome to our world. There will be carnage.
    As everyone else has said: practice, practice, practice.
    Stainless, plastic, that'll be a personal choice, but get to where you can do them without thinking about it. Trust me, if I take a break of a few months, or switch from one type to the other, there will be cursing and cold sweats in the dark for a few minutes. If all else fails, try these two tricks: 1) if you get too frustrated, wrap the film up and stick it in the tank and get out of there for a few minutes and come back and try it again, or 2) leave the first few inches of the 'leader' out of the can and pre-load that in the light. (if you're using plastic reels, trim the loading edge of your film to rid it of sharp corners-especially if you've cut across a sprocket hole-then they won't snag on the reel.)
    Good. Fast. Cheap. (pick any two)

  6. #16
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by q2q@tds.net View Post
    1) if you get too frustrated, wrap the film up and stick it in the tank and get out of there for a few minutes and come back and try it again,
    Best idea ever.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Congrats on your first roll of film! Trust me, it only gets easier, and more fascinating, from here.

    Best advice I can offer is what you mentioned -- get an expired or spare strip of film, and practice loading it in daylight. When you're comfortable with that, do it with your eyes closed or in a darkened room. It won't take long, don't worry.

    Plastic or metal, the advice is the same. You'll get it...best of luck in the future!

  8. #18
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    I figure I should stick to practicing with stainless steel since that's what we have in the darkroom.

    I don't seem to have a problem finding the nibs on the reel; its keeping the darn film from krinkling or jumping a track that's frustrating. Teacher said to listen for a "swoosh, swoosh" sound. Supposed to mean the film is being loaded onto the reel without any problem. Yeah right! Maybe if I slow down a tad.

    Last night, the lab assistants helped with mixing the chemistry. Reel (pun intended) test comes when I can do everything (loading film, and mixing chemicals) by myself.

  9. #19
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    It really is not that hard. After a few times it will become second nature. After two weeks I don't even need to read the bottles when I mix chems (I do usually check myself).
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  10. #20
    Chris Nielsen's Avatar
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    I think I just finally figured it out. Only been trying off and on for 3 years :-)

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