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  1. #11
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I'm not very patient so I often yank my film out of the freezer and put it right in the camera. Never had any trouble.
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Domin View Post
    Actually kodak has somewhat different opinion:
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...fo/e30/e30.pdf
    There's table on second page with warm up time from different temperatures for different types of film.
    Kodak says also than RH must be under 50%, somewhat difficult to achieve in commercial home freezers.

  3. #13

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    Freezer Burn?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    Kodak says also than RH must be under 50%,
    somewhat difficult to achieve in commercial
    home freezers.
    Freezer humidities run very low. As I've mentioned
    this thread freeze drying takes place. Moisture is
    pulled from whatever and deposits as ice. Ever
    hear of freezer burn? Dan

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Freezer humidities run very low. As I've mentioned
    this thread freeze drying takes place. Moisture is
    pulled from whatever and deposits as ice. Ever
    hear of freezer burn? Dan
    This explains the brittleness of the film...

  5. #15
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    Just for test purposes buy a few fresh rolls, shoot them, process-develop them, dry them the way you normally do. If the dust also shows in the test rolls, the problem is not with the freezing. If that proves to be the case there are many past threads here on how to control dust in your darkroom procedure.

    I freeze my sheet film from between 1-3 years. The only dust I am aware of is when I am not as careful about cleaning everything in the darkroom as I know I should. The darkroom is in the basement. Heat rises, but dust falls. I have not been able to figure that out. Maybe I just track it in on my shoes or wear it in on my clothes.

    John Powers

  6. #16
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    Let me start by saying I am far from an expert on film. I do have a LOT of old frozen film though, including some really old Panatomic-X and Kodalith that I picked up from an old timer that closed shop last spring. It was still frozen when the guy handed me the box and said "Do you want this too?" and is in my freezer now. I have been shooting it off a little at a time and have had no issues despite the fact it has been frozen since the late 70's and early 80's (no issues with the film that is, the "pilot error" learning curve moments were plentiful at first though).
    Remember, Tuesday is Soylent Green day.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Freezer humidities run very low...
    On the contrary, the freezer compartment of a typical home frost-free refrigerator/freezer subjects its contents to very high relative humidity (RH). See the second paragraph on p. 665 here:

    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/..._HiRes_v1a.pdf

    I place Kodak sheet film, which is sealed in foil envlopes at low RH, as are Kodak, Fuji and Ilford roll film, in the freezer compartment for long-term storage. Ilford sheet film and all of the above after initial opening are put in plastic bags and returned to the refrigerator compartment.

    I don't see how Allesandro's storage protocol could aggravate dust problems. There might be other emulsion issues from the temperature cycling, but RH-induced static charging shouldn't be among them.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    On the contrary, the freezer compartment of a typical home
    frost-free refrigerator/freezer subjects its contents to very high
    relative humidity (RH).
    Only during brief periods of defrosting. I doubt the 70 degrees
    fahrenheit and near 100% RH stated. Dan

  9. #19
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    You can "freeze-dry" yourself in your home freezer: put the stuff to be dried in a beaker, fix a piece of tissue paper over the beaker, and wait a day or two....wouldn't work with 100%RH in your home freezer....

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    On the contrary, the freezer compartment of a typical home frost-free refrigerator/freezer subjects its contents to very high relative humidity (RH). See the second paragraph on p. 665 here:

    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/..._HiRes_v1a.pdf
    I don't know about how Wilhelm discovered this, but living in a place where temps are below freezing for 4 months of the year, I do know about cold air, and relative humidity. Temperature is a factor in relative humidity. Air at 30℃ can hold a tremendous amount of water, Air at -30℃ can hold considerably less water, even at the same relative humidity. Taking an object that is at -30℃ into a place that is at +30℃ and moist you will get a trail of water vapour and condensate as the air around the object cools and the water comes out of the air, it may actually freeze onto the object.

    Now, I have been out taking photographs at -18℃, film that was in the freezer at home, goes into the bag frozen, it stays frozen during the shoot, it goes back into the bag, still frozen, and when the bag goes into the house, it stays in the corner zipped up until the next day, so that condensation that forms, forms on the outside of the camera bag, not on the camera or film.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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