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  1. #1

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    freezing film and dust

    Can using a previously deep freezed film cause the gelatine to be more receptive to dust when hung to dry?
    I mean, can the gelatine be ruined for being exposed to such low a temp?
    The plastic canister isn't vacuum proof so a little air gets in anyway, at the factory ecc...
    I'm having a heck of difficulty trying to get slides and negatives as dust free as possible. I've found that when I'm using deep freezed films (-18°C) I have this problem.
    I hung them to dry in my bathroom previously hot steamed to get the dust down.

  2. #2

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    Well freezing does freeze dry. That is moisture is
    drawn from whatever. The more dry the more static
    prone so the more prone to collect dust. Dan

  3. #3
    trexx's Avatar
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    I cannot see how freezing would make the film more attractive to dust. I can be believe that he freezing has created micro fissures in the emulsion giving the appearance of dust. How common is this and have you a scan to show?
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  4. #4
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    All of my film is frozen immediately upon receipt. Of course it is in its original packaging. I don't see any problem with dust because of this.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  5. #5

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    Maybe what I'm referring to it's not dust but micro fractures, maybe the gelatine becomes brittle to the point of grain clumping. I've had issue of pieces of emulsion coming off the base (Agfa Apx-100), yesterday I've developed a Sensia roll in Kodak e6 chemistry and in the first roll frames the emulsion has become brittle and have defects visible on the sky portion of the image. Maybe dust collects more easily due to the emulsion being "swollen" when it reaches ambient temperature. Dunno.
    The fact is I never experience all these cons when I avoid putting the films into the freezer.

  6. #6
    AmandaTom's Avatar
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    How are you freezing the film? Do you just put the canister in the freezer? How are you thawing it out? If film is frozen and thawed properly it should not have any issues; it is a common and effective way of prolonging the life of film.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by AmandaTom View Post
    How are you freezing the film? Do you just put the canister in the freezer? How are you thawing it out? If film is frozen and thawed properly it should not have any issues; it is a common and effective way of prolonging the life of film.
    I don't take the canister off from the original packaging, but I put the original packaging into a zip-lock bag, then in the deep freezer. When I take them out from the deep freezer I let the plastic case warm up at least for 2 hours before opening it.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by trexx View Post
    I cannot see how freezing would make the film more
    attractive to dust. I can be believe that he freezing has
    created micro fissures in the emulsion giving the appearance
    of dust. How common is this and have you a scan to show?
    Well now there is another possibility. As the film dries the
    emulsion shrinks and becomes less elastic. Similarly, I've
    read of increased micro fissures within a print emulsion
    subjected to the 200F temperatures of a hot press. Dan

  9. #9
    AmandaTom's Avatar
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    Two hours is not long enough to thaw the film. The metal and the film warm at different rates. You mention that the first frame of the e-6 film had a flaking problem--this and the last frame are the most vulnerable if the film is not at ambient temperature. In that case it is probably fissures in the emulsion. Thaw the film, ideally, for 24 hours, but a minimum of 5-6

  10. #10
    Domin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmandaTom View Post
    Two hours is not long enough to thaw the film. The metal and the film warm at different rates. You mention that the first frame of the e-6 film had a flaking problem--this and the last frame are the most vulnerable if the film is not at ambient temperature. In that case it is probably fissures in the emulsion. Thaw the film, ideally, for 24 hours, but a minimum of 5-6
    Actually kodak has somewhat different opinion:
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...fo/e30/e30.pdf
    There's table on second page with warm up time from different temperatures for different types of film.

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