Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,522   Posts: 1,543,805   Online: 763
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    328

    How long before B&W film must be processed

    Hi -- newbie question here again.

    Last night we received our first assignment. Shallow DOF. It's not due quite yet, but I know that if I wait until the last minute, something is bound to go awry. The next lab this coming Thursday, will be contact sheets. That means I have the weekend free to shoot.

    Lectures are on Mondays; Lab is always on a Thursday night.

    My questions are, after a roll of film has been exposed:

    (1) What precautions do you take until the roll of film can be processed.

    (2) Maximum length of time that can pass before film degradation sets in.

    We will have a total of 10 assignments of the course of the semester and are expected to shoot 1 36 exp. roll per assignment.

    The reason I'm asking is that conceiveably, an assignment can be completed in a day, or over the course of a weekend. So if I get ahead of schedule, is that a bad thing

  2. #2
    David William White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,182
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    If months to years, throw it in the fridge. Otherwise, no worries whatsoever.

    P.S. However, you should develop right away just to make sure you've got your shots -- might need to reshoot!

  3. #3
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,720
    Images
    23
    People process 15 year old rolls that come out fine. I don't think you should worry to much. I know that it says process promptly but that is not totally necessary.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  4. #4
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    328
    Can I place it in one of those plastic film canisters and keep it in the fridge until I'm ready to process it?

  5. #5
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NH - Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,678
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Can I place it in one of those plastic film canisters and keep it in the fridge until I'm ready to process it?
    Yes, you can throw it in the fridge. Just let it warm up before you remove it from the canister. But if it's just a few days/weeks I wouldn't bother.

    I just developed a few duplicate sheets that were several years old. They look as good as the first set I developed at the time of shooting. They were frozen the whole time (I lost them in the freezer).

  6. #6
    David William White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,182
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    Sure. Label 'em.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,914
    Images
    54
    Sure,let it come to room temp 5or10mins before you start processing to avoid any condensation.

  8. #8
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    328
    Sweet! - thats good to know. Thanks everyone. I think I can relax now.

  9. #9
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,118
    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Sweet! - thats good to know. Thanks everyone. I think I can relax now.
    Until you wake up in the middle of the night with the next question.

    That is ok. That is what we are here for and why we get paid the big bucks.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,380
    Images
    60
    It would be a good idea to develop a habit of putting all your film that is awaiting development in the same location, accompanied by notes about what you photographed and how you exposed the film.

    You should label very clearly the film. Some day (maybe soon) you may shoot multiple films, or possibly the same film, at different EIs. If you get into the habit of labelling carefully, and keeping good notes, it will benefit you.

    Whatever you do, make sure that it is easy to tell exposed film apart from unexposed film. And if you load bulk film, label the cassettes themselves.

    Matt

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin