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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    I am going to develop mine in tap water because I have a whole sink of it.

    Why bother?

    Send your film away (use Kodak 100 color) and be done with it.

    If ID 11 does what you want (It's not a pushing developer, it's a compensating one) fine, If it's what's under the sink, then you get what you get. Not how I develop my art. I suspect your chances for success are limited.

    I don't mean to insult you, I just don't understand how you expect to learn anything from this.

    tim in san jose
    Part of the reason I posted this is to get feedback. So it apparently worked. I'm not married to ID-11, it's just what I have, but if there is some good reason to use something else, I will. From what I've been able to ascertain, ID-11 isn't the preferred developer for this, but I haven't seen anything to indicate that it is a terrible one. Maybe you could just fill me in on why it would be the wrong choice, rather than going where you decided to go.

    No, I'm not a professional at this, I thought I was pretty upfront about that.

  2. #12
    Leighgion's Avatar
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    I have purposely not offered developer suggestions since I never touched any Delta 3200.

  3. #13
    Nikanon's Avatar
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    No one has yet mentioned its more than just deciding to shoot at an iso, its the particular effect gained from doing so, this is chosen by looking at a films CURVE, look up the hurter and driffield curve of film and learn about curves, when you understand curves of film youll understand how to choose an exposure, the basic way to put it is film is a light sensitive material that has a point in which light will give it a maximum density of film and a minimum density, any exposure between those two points will render an image that can be developed, curves teach you how to control them, learn curves and youll better control your work.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrdarklight View Post
    I'm not married to ID-11, it's just what I have, but if there is some good reason to use something else, I will.
    Ilford ID-11 is practically the same as Kodak D-76. Both of these are standard developers and have been for many years.

    I don't see a problem with using this for developing Delta 3200 or any other black and white film.

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart...-11&mdc=Search


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #15

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    If ID-11 is the same as D76, no, there's absolutely nothing wrong with using it. I am not familiar with ID-11 myself. For Delta 3200 I usually use DD-X 1:4 or XTOL 1:1. And yes, if you shoot at 1600, develop @ the time listed for 3200.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by naugastyle View Post
    If ID-11 is the same as D76, no, there's absolutely nothing wrong with using it. I am not familiar with ID-11 myself. For Delta 3200 I usually use DD-X 1:4 or XTOL 1:1. And yes, if you shoot at 1600, develop @ the time listed for 3200.


    ID-11 is essentially the same as D76. It will never give you box speed, nothing will with 3200 film, but it also will not give you the speed something like Diafine will give you.

    My point wasn't that he shouldn't use ID-11, just that you don't make decisions based upon what's under the kitchen sink if you want to learn anything about photographic development. And no, I am not a professional (photographer). I did go to school at NESOP many years ago but I am, for all intense purposes, a robotics engineer.

    Look at the Massive Development chart and see what the possibilities are.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    ID-11 is essentially the same as D76. It will never give you box speed, nothing will with 3200 film, but it also will not give you the speed something like Diafine will give you.

    My point wasn't that he shouldn't use ID-11, just that you don't make decisions based upon what's under the kitchen sink if you want to learn anything about photographic development. And no, I am not a professional (photographer). I did go to school at NESOP many years ago but I am, for all intense purposes, a robotics engineer.

    Look at the Massive Development chart and see what the possibilities are.

    tim in san jose
    I guess I feel kind of silly explaining this to you, but here goes: Everything is a compromise. There is a "best" developer to use for Delta 3200. If I want to get the best results, I can go buy $20 worth of this best developer for the two rolls of 3200 that I'm going to shoot and use the ID-11 for my Delta 400. Then, when I try some Kodak and Fuji and Agfa, I can go spend money on the best developers for those films. In the process, I'll end up with ten kinds of developer that mostly go to waste because I used only a little of them because they were the best.

    Or I can do what most people do, which is try to use things efficiently. Now, if ID-11 was going to turn my prints into monotones, obviously I would not use it. But barring some good reason, which you have not bothered to supply, I will do what is most efficient for me and use the ID-11.

    Sometimes you don't develop a roll of film to learn something. Sometimes you just develop it so you can get the negatives.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrdarklight View Post

    Sometimes you don't develop a roll of film to learn something. Sometimes you just develop it so you can get the negatives.
    Not a problem. Just two different reasons to photograph.

    It's that "image vs. process" question again.

    Good luck.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

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