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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    So if we're not doing enough agitation - what specifically in one's agitation style is the cause of edge surge marks? If uneven development is linked to insufficient agitation I don't have a problem agitating more - but I'd like to reduce the chance of sprocket holes ghosting on the edges - which is a much harder problem to fix after the fact.
    The only time I've ever had surge marks, I was agitating really slowly. Not sure why...I think I was trying to reduce grain by being gentle or something I'd made up in my head. It looked awful--and was extra-grainy to boot.

  2. #72
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I'd imagine you get surge marks along the perforation of your film if the rate at which developer is being replenished through the sprocket holes is higher than what's being replenished on the rest of the film surface. If you agitate too slowly this could happen, is the logical conclusion in my mind.
    When I agitate my film, my standard pattern is to invert the tank a full 180 degrees, all while I twist the tank about a quarter turn. I do two or three of these inversions every interval depending on the size of the tank. My largest tank I can only manage two, and the smallest two I manage three in the period of ten seconds, including lightly shaking the tank and then rapping it firmly on the counter top twice at the end.
    I have never had sprocket hole surge marks that way. But I have had it when I slow down agitation to much slower and gentler patterns.

    I hope that helps.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #73
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    I usually do about 3 per 8-10 seconds as well. I've had surge marks in the past from, what I remember to be, too violent of agitation - which is why I slowed it down more consistently. I'm beginning to wonder if the variables that might really be at play here are:

    1. Developer volume in the tank (i.e. is it to the brim which makes displacement harder).
    2. Photo-flo residue on reels.

    Both seem like possibilities with the second one being somewhat of a silent killer. I'd have to test both independently using the same agitation style I've been using for the last couple of months to determine if either affect the outcome differently.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

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  4. #74
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Regarding point 1. Yes, you have to leave enough room in the tank so that the developer stands a chance to move around freely. Always always use the same volume. Consistency with everything is key to success with film processing. For my tanks it's 90% full, no matter which tank I use (got 120 single roll, 120 double roll, and 120 four roll).
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    No developer is designed to give uneven development.
    Thomas - that is a great comment.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  6. #76

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    Bethe, I have struggled with similar agitation issues in the past. Problems were mostly solved following Kodak's agitation procedure here: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/aj3/aj3.pdf see the chart on page 3 of 6 of the pdf file.

    Several responses to your post suggest that uneven development is sensitive to developer and film combinations. I agree. I never have problems now with Tri-X 120 and D76 1:1 following Kodak's inversion procedure with SS tanks and reels. Occasionally however, I still have issues with Plus-X 120 and D76 1:1 using the exact same procedures. Go figure?

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